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Conclusion

  • Agung Wardana
Chapter

Abstract

This is the concluding chapter, where I draw several conclusions. Firstly, the designation of ‘provincial strategic areas’, which at first was regarded as an attempt to address contemporary Bali’s institutional, economic, environmental, and cultural problems caused by the rapid expansion of mass tourism and property speculation on the island, has been deflected to accelerate this expansion yet further. Legal and institutional pluralism in decentralised Bali has provided more arenas for social actors to advance their interests, as well as to constrain the trajectory of tourism expansion with mixed and uncertain outcomes. In addition, the chapter demonstrates the implications of the analytical approach used in the book and the book’s findings to the existing body of literature.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agung Wardana
    • 1
  1. 1.Universitas Gadjah MadaYogyakartaIndonesia

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