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Introduction

  • Agung Wardana
Chapter

Abstract

Tourism has been the overriding economic sector in Bali for decades. In the decentralised era, it has even expanded further since it is not only an important source of local revenues, but it also provides rent-seeking opportunities for local elites. As a result, tourism is promoted, developed, and expanded across Bali by overlooking its environmental, social, and cultural impacts. Consequently, how tourism has shaped the island’s landscape and informed the ways in which socio-ecological crisis resulted from its expansion should be addressed. In this chapter, I develop an approach to adequately examine the reorganisation of space as a response to socio-ecological crisis in contemporary Bali. The approach is developed by reconceptualising the notions of space and law based on the theories of critical geography and anthropology of law, especially legal pluralism. The chapter also demonstrates the contribution of this book to the existing literature on Bali Studies and Law and Development in Asia.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Agung Wardana
    • 1
  1. 1.Universitas Gadjah MadaYogyakartaIndonesia

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