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‘Native’ Versus Non-native English Speakers (NES/NNES) and English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) at Academic Conferences

  • Michael Guest
Chapter
Part of the Springer Texts in Education book series (SPTE)

Abstract

At many academic conferences, the number of non-native English-speaking participants is greater than that of native English speakers. But is the distinction an accurate or helpful one? In this chapter, we will first look briefly at the NES-NNES distinction and discuss its relevance in terms of performing CPs. Related to this NES-NNES debate, one of the more interesting and influential trends in applied linguistics over the past several years has been the gradual emergence and acceptance of English as a lingua franca (ELF), wherein NNES non-standard English forms are viewed and used as a distinct and legitimate variety of English. Academic conferences, given their international scope, serve as an almost perfect paradigm of the phenomenon. Therefore, we will discuss some of the features of ELF, the social/psychological effects it can have upon conference participants, and its impact upon conference speech events such as CPs.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of MedicineUniversity of MiyazakiMiyazakiJapan

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