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The Pathway to Find the Voices

  • Vicki Adele Pascoe
Chapter

Abstract

Chapter 2 justifies the multidisciplinary, social justice approach required by this study to adequately and comprehensively explain the lived experiences of IMGs in Australia. The design of the study, my position as researcher, and intersectionality as an analytic tool are advanced. Participants share their voices and important ethical considerations are raised.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Principal ResearcherIndependent Education ConsultancyAdelaideAustralia

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