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PS-2 Controlled Four Wheel Base Drive Badminton Playing Robot

  • Shivam MishraEmail author
  • V. K. Sachan
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 847)

Abstract

There are many researchers and engineers who aim to design such robots that can outplay the human players in the field of sports. A design of badminton playing robot is presented by this paper which can be controlled by the PS-2 (play station) controller, and it can also serve shuttlecock in the badminton court similar to a human player. It is done so as to incorporate advancement in the field of sports. It aims at designing a configuration which can assist the players in practicing badminton. A shuttlecock holding system is designed using pneumatics which can be preloaded with three shuttlecocks and can further be increased according to the convenience. A hitting mechanism was designed so that a standard badminton racket can be swung and can be used to hit the shuttlecocks. The problems and all the related solutions that were involved in the designing of this robot are discussed. The practical application of the design indicates that this robot is able to hold three shuttlecocks and can serve with high accuracy and is efficient enough to hit the returning shuttlecocks with high accuracy. This means that a robust robot is designed which can be controlled by any human being.

Keywords

Badminton Motor control Mobile robot PS-2 controller Serving shuttlecock Microcontroller 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.KIET Group of InstitutionGhaziabadIndia

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