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Anatomy and Physiology of optic nerve head

  • Xiaoxia Li
  • Ningli WangEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Visual Science and Eye Diseases book series (AVSED, volume 1)

Abstract

The optic nerve is a unique structure as it is only surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid in the nervous system (Fig. 8.1). The functions of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) include nutrition supply, strength to intraocular pressure, taking away metabolic waste, etc. However, the functions and mechanism are not clear yet.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology, Beijing Tongren Eye Center, Beijing Tongren HospitalCapital Medical UniversityBeijingChina

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