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Conclusion

  • Robin Ramcharan
  • Bertrand Ramcharan
Chapter

Abstract

The study of the UDHR as a political project and global dialogue over rights with multiple cultural and philosophical influences continues to today. The conclusion highlights recent critical scholarship on the so-called endtimes for human rights and the remnants of the Asian values debate, and dialogue on universal human rights values in the current geopolitical context in Asia. A rising China is offering its own vision of human rights, which lays stress on economic, cultural, and social rights before civil and political rights. In this context, Chinese scholars have begun to claim the legacy of P.C. Chang, the Chinese drafter of universal values. The conclusion offers ideas on addressing key challenges—implementation, prevention, protection, equality, and equity—of the present and future in Asia. The development of strong national human rights systems is critical to advancing human rights.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robin Ramcharan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Bertrand Ramcharan
    • 3
  1. 1.Webster UniversityBangkokThailand
  2. 2.Asia CentreBangkokThailand
  3. 3.Emeritus President, UPR InfoAlythUK

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