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Electrophysiological Signature of Pain

  • Zi-Fang Zhao
  • You Wan
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1099)

Abstract

Pain is a complex neural function involving cognition, sensory, emotion, and memory. Imaging studies have shown that multiple brain regions are actively engaged in the processing of pain. However, roles of each brain regions and their contribution to pain are still largely unknown. Recent studies with electrophysiology especially high-density electroencephalogram (EEG) or multichannel recordings techniques have provided more insights into the dynamics of pain signature. The accumulations of the evidence could facilitate our understanding of pain and provide potential methods for objective pain evaluation and treatment of chronic pain.

Keywords

Pain Neural oscillation Electroencephalogram 

Notes

Conflict of Interests

The authors declare no conflict of interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Neuroscience Research Institute, Peking UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Department of NeurobiologySchool of Basic Medical Sciences, Peking UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Key Laboratory for Neuroscience, Ministry of Education/National Health and Family Planning CommissionPeking UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China

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