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Diffusion Policy Assessment of Solar Energy

  • Khalid Alrashoud
  • Ryoichi Nakayama
Chapter

Abstract

The shift from fossil fuel reliance has become an essential energy policy for vital reasons, including climate change, security of supply, and cost competitiveness. Industrialized countries, in different parts of the world, have made significant progress in this regard by developing eco-friendly alternative energy sources. However, this development has faced many barriers that led to some stumbling and delaying. This paper analyzes the efforts exerted by seven selected developed and developing countries in promoting and expanding solar energy use to better understand the shortcomings of each country that may cause a delay or termination of some solar energy projects.

Keywords

Solar energy Environmental policy Technology diffusion mechanisms Policy assessment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Transdisciplinary Science and EngineeringTokyo Institute of TechnologyMeguro-kuJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School, System Design ProgramKogakuin UniversityShinjukuJapan

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