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Effect of the Shock Absorber of the Shock Absorption Benefits for Upper Arm

  • Yiyang Chen
  • Wenhsin Chiu
  • Yuting Chen
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 513)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to explore the effect of handlebars shock absorbers on the human upper body muscles. We recruited ten male adult subjects to join our experiment. Subjects need to respectively rode the bike with shock absorber and without the shock absorber on the two kinds of vibration conditions (40 and 50 Hz). The vibration generated by tire contact with the ground while riding was simulated through the self-made vibration simulation machine. The muscle activities of ulnaris, radialis, biceps brachii, triceps brachii of participant were collected by BTS Bioengineering® Wireless EMG meter. Descriptive statistics and one-way ANOVA were adopted to analyze the data. The results showed only ulnaris muscle has reached statistically significant level (p < 0.05) under low-frequency shock conditions, the ulnaris muscle, and triceps brachii muscles has reached statistically significant level (p < 0.05) under high-frequency shock conditions.

Keywords

Bike Shock absorbers Muscle activity Upper arm 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Physical EducationNational Taiwan Normal UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Department of Physical EducationNational Tsing Hua UniversityHsinchuTaiwan
  3. 3.Department of Industrial ManagementChung Hua UniversityHsinchuTaiwan

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