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Introduction

  • Kaori Fuyuto
Chapter
Part of the Springer Theses book series (Springer Theses)

Abstract

Particle physics is based on quantum field theory. It predicts that all particles have a partner with the same mass but opposite charge, which is called antiparticles. The presence was first confirmed by Carl Anderson in 1932, since then, the antiparticles have been established in various experiments. Today, they can be produced in a laboratory and used for a further quest of the Universe.

It would be natural to imagine that both the particle and antiparticle equally exist in the Universe. However, looking around our Universe, everything is made of the particle. Although the antiparticles like μ+ can be observed in the atmosphere they are just secondary particles produced in association with collisions of cosmic rays. No one knows why only the particle is left in the current Universe, which is one of the mysteries our Universe holds. In this chapter, we give a brief introduction to it and explain necessary conditions for creating the asymmetry.

Keywords

Baryon asymmetry of the Universe Sakharov’s criteria 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kaori Fuyuto
    • 1
  1. 1.Amherst Center for Fundamental Interactions, Department of PhysicsUniversity of Massachusetts AmherstAmherstUSA

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