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Toward Cleaner Cities: Renewable Energy Initiatives in Malaysia

  • Nasrudin Abd Rahim
  • Hang Seng Che
  • Md Hasanuzzaman
  • Asiful Habib
Chapter

Abstract

As an oil-producing nation, Malaysia has long relied on fossil fuels for meeting the country’s energy demand. Nevertheless, understanding that over-relying on fossil fuel will have adverse effect to the environment and economy, Malaysian government began to look into potentials offered by renewable energy (RE) resources since the early 2000. Over the years, various policies have been drafted and implemented to grow the renewable energy sector in Malaysia. Recently in the Paris Convention, Malaysia together with other ratifying nations of COP21 has reinstated its commitments toward reducing greenhouse gas emission (GHG) and adopting cleaner energy. According to the Intended Nationally Determined Contribution signed, Malaysia has expressed the intention to reduce its greenhouse gas emission intensity of gross domestic product (GDP) by 45% by 2030 compared to that of 2005. Out of this pledged 45%, 35% is on an unconditional basis, while the remaining 10% will be fulfilled provided there is funding, technology transfer, and capacity building from developed nations (UNFCCC 2015).

Keywords

Sustainable energy Renewable energy Malaysia 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nasrudin Abd Rahim
    • 1
  • Hang Seng Che
    • 1
  • Md Hasanuzzaman
    • 1
  • Asiful Habib
    • 1
  1. 1.UMPEDACUniversity of MalayaKuala LumpurMalaysia

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