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Limits to Urbanization: Application of Integrated Assessment for Smart City Development in India

  • Benjamin McLellan
  • Tania Bhattacharya
  • Anindya Bhattacharya
  • Tetsuo Tezuka
Chapter

Abstract

The Government of India recently initiated a smart city programme, aiming to promote 100 cities as “smart cities” across the country. While the definition of what a smart city actually is has been left largely to the cities themselves to define, the elements of waste, energy, information technology (IT) and transportation are largely considered to be important. In parallel with this programme, and distinct from it, the Toyota Foundation funded the authors’ research into the water-energy nexus and sustainability within the context of three of the proposed project cities. This latter work is described in this chapter.

Keywords

Smart city India Integrated assessment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin McLellan
    • 1
  • Tania Bhattacharya
    • 2
  • Anindya Bhattacharya
    • 2
  • Tetsuo Tezuka
    • 1
  1. 1.Graduate School of Energy ScienceKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.The Celestial EarthGurgaonIndia

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