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Conclusion

  • Dale Leorke
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents the key findings from my theoretical and ethnographic analysis of location-based games, before providing a set of recommendations for their future design and funding.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale Leorke
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre of Excellence in Game Culture StudiesUniversity of TampereTampereFinland

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