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Interphalangeal Arthroscopy: Surgical Approaches and Application

  • Ka Yuk Fan
  • Tun Hing Lui
Chapter

Abstract

Interphalangeal joints (IPJs) of the toes are synovial hinge joints, with a single sagittal plane of motion allowing flexion and extension. Range of motion of IPJ of the great toe is 0–90°, whereas that for second to fifth toe is variable. IPJ is stabilized by a thick plantar plate, and two strong collateral ligaments run from the lateral aspect of the phalangeal head to the base of the distally articulating phalanx [1]. There are two concave facets with a central ridge at the base of the distal articulating phalanx, conforming to the medial and lateral condyle of the pulley-shaped head of the proximal articulating phalanx. The proximal articular surface is larger than the distal counterpart [2].

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ka Yuk Fan
    • 1
  • Tun Hing Lui
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedics and TraumatologyNorth District HospitalHong KongChina
  2. 2.Department of OrthopaedicsSouthern Medical UniversityHong KongChina
  3. 3.Department of Orthopaedics and TraumatologyChinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  4. 4.Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institute of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of ScienceShenzhenChina

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