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Setup, Equipment and Surgical Instruments

  • Samuel K. K. Ling
  • Tun Hing Lui
Chapter

Abstract

Operating theatres can be regarded as the centre of any orthopaedic service, with many surgeons ‘living’ in them. The name operating theatre/surgical theatre arises from historical contexts, with surgery previously performed in an open hall on an elevated table surrounded by a tiered amphitheatre for spectators/students to observe and learn. These dated theatres have now been superseded by operating rooms with a thoroughly controlled artificial environment, allowing meticulous regulation of luminosity, airflow, temperature and humidity. Concurrently, the actual surgical operations have also progressed from a being gruesome and gory procedure to its current trademark of being sterile and sleek.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Samuel K. K. Ling
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tun Hing Lui
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedics and TraumatologyNorth District HospitalHong KongChina
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedics and TraumatologyChinese University of Hong KongHong KongChina
  3. 3.Institute of Biomedicine and Biotechnology, Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology—Chinese Academy of ScienceShenzhenChina
  4. 4.Department of OrthopaedicsSouthern Medical UniversityGuangzhouChina

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