Advertisement

Land Reform, Participatory Governance, and Grassroots Democracy in Progressive Chengdu, China

  • Fangxin Yi
Chapter
Part of the ARI - Springer Asia Series book series (ARI, volume 6)

Abstract

China’s changing urban development policies and urban landscapes in the transition from socialist to a market economy have been focused on entrepreneurialism and elite-dominance. However, with decentralization as a major feature of changes in governance in China in recent years, differences among localities in approaches to the planning and development of city regions are found to be diverse. Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, is proving to be an exceptional case in its approaches toward inclusiveness in decision-making, access to land, and its relationships with its rural hinterlands. Based on policies and programs adopted by local government to narrow urban-rural disparities in Chengdu, this paper explores the progressive features of governing of Chengdu from an analytical assessment of reflexive interrelationships among land property reform, participatory governance, and grassroots democracy. The central question addressed is whether or not and how the adopted land property reform enhances the involvement of residents in participatory governance and the rise of local grassroots democracy. The case of Chengdu shows that even in a state-dominated political system, progressive features are gradually becoming apparent and prominent.

References

  1. Cabannes, Y., & Zhuang, M. (2014). Participatory budgeting at scale and bridging the rural−urban divide in Chengdu. Environment and Urbanization, 26(1), 257–275.  https://doi.org/10.1177/0956247813509146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Cabannes, Y. (2016). Participatory budgeting: A significant contribution to participatory democracy. Environment and Urbanization, 16(1), 27–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cai, F., & Tao, Y. (2000). Political economics on urban-rural inequality. Social Science. China, 4, 11–22 (In Chinese).Google Scholar
  4. Chen, Y. (2012). Rural governance institutional exploration: Survey from village evaluation council (cunzhuang pingyihui) of Chengdu of Sichuan. Rural Economy, 2012, 10 (in Chinese).Google Scholar
  5. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2007). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2007. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  6. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2008). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2008. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  7. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2009). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2009. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  8. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2010). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2010. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  9. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2011). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2011. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  10. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2012). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2012. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  11. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2013). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2013. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  12. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2014). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2014. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  13. Chengdu Statistics Bureau (CSB). (2016). Chengdu statistics yearbook, 2016. Chengdu: Chengdu Statistics Press.Google Scholar
  14. Ding, C. (2007). Policy and praxis of land acquisition in China. Land Use Policy, 24(1), 1–13.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Douglass, M. (2016a). The rise of progressive cities in Asia: Toward human flourishing in Asia’s urban transition (p. 248). Singapore: Asia Research Institute Working Paper Series No.Google Scholar
  16. Douglass, M. (2016b). From Good City to Progressive City: Reclaiming the urban future in Asia. In H. Rangan, M. K. Ng, J. Chase, & L. Porter (Eds.), Insurgencies and revolutions: Reflections on John Friedmann’s contributions to planning theory and practice. Routledge (in press).Google Scholar
  17. Fan, Y., Wu, Y., Wu, A. M., & Wang, W. (2018). Decentralised governance and empowerment of county governments in China: Betting on the weak or the strong? Local Government Studies, 1–27.Google Scholar
  18. Jiang, Z. (2002). Building a well-off society and opening up a new situation of socialist career with Chinese characteristics (in Chinese). People’s Daily., November, 8, 2002.Google Scholar
  19. Kanbur, R., & Zhang, X. B. (2005). Fifty years of regional inequality in China: A journey through central planning, reform, and openness. Review of Development Economics, 9(1), 87–106.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9361.2005.00265.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Lin, G. C., & Ho, S. P. (2005). The state, land system, and land development processes in contemporary China. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 95(2), 411–436.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8306.2005.00467.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Lin, G. C. S. (2009). Developing China: Land, politics, and social conditions. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  22. Lin, G. C., & Yi, F. (2011). Urbanization of capital or capitalization on urban land? Land development and local public finance in urbanizing China. Urban Geography, 32(1), 50–79.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Matthews, R. C. (1986). The economics of institutions and the sources of growth. The Economic Journal, 96(384), 903–918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Naisbitt, J., & Naisbitt, D. (2012). Innovation in China: The Chengdu triangle. Tianjin: The Naisbitt China Institute.Google Scholar
  25. Ng, M. K., & Xu, J. (2000). Development control in post-reform China: The case of Liuhua Lake Park. Cities, 17(6), 409–418.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. North, D. C. (1990). Institutions, institutional change and economic performance. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge university press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. Qin, B. (2015). City profile: Chengdu. Cities, 43, 18–27.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cities.2014.11.006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Schotter, A. (1981). The economic theory of social institutions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ye, Y., & LeGates, R. (2013). Coordinating urban and rural development in China: Learning from Chengdu. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Press.Google Scholar
  30. Ye, Y., LeGates, R., & Qin, B. (2013). Coordinated urban-rural development planning in China. Journal of the American Planning Association, 79(2), 125–137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Zhou, Y. (2012). Chengdu, the future of Garden City, economic observer paper. 2012. September, 21. (in Chinese) http://news.sohu.com/20091222/n269109259.shtml Accessed 10 June 2017.
  32. Zhu, J. (2002). Urban development under ambiguous property rights: A case of China’s transition economy. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 26(1), 41–57.  https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2427.00362.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Zhu, J. (2004). Local developmental state and order in China’s urban development during transition. International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, 28(2), 424–447.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.0309-1317.2004.00527.x.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Zhu, J. (2005). A transitional institution for the emerging land market in urban China. Urban Studies, 42(8), 1369–1390.  https://doi.org/10.1080/00420980500150714.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Zhu, J., & Guo, Y. (2013). Fragmented Peri-urbanisation led by Autonomous Village development under informal institution in high-density regions: The case of Nanhai, China. Urban Studies, 51(6), 1120–1145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fangxin Yi
    • 1
  1. 1.National University of SingaporeSingaporeSingapore

Personalised recommendations