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Developing a Sustainable Africa through Green Growth

  • Kobus Jonker
  • Bryan Robinson
Chapter

Abstract

Environmental sustainability is a delicate balance, and Africa with its acute development problems is particularly susceptible to environmental problems, especially in terms of deforestation, desertification, pollution and waste. China has committed itself to halting the growth of its own greenhouse gases by 2030, and seems to have prioritised environmental issues more so than Africa, an example of which is the African Union’s Aspirations which fail to prioritise environmental issues. The Forum on China–Africa Cooperation’s Johannesburg Action Plan of 2015 specifically refers to environmental protection and tackling climate change. China can play a key role in addressing environmental sustainability in Africa through the technological transfer of innovations in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, focusing on renewable energy solutions and finding the ecological balance that supports economic development.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kobus Jonker
    • 1
  • Bryan Robinson
    • 1
  1. 1.Nelson Mandela UniversityPort ElizabethSouth Africa

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