Coarse Grain Layer on Stress Corrosion Cracking Resistance of Al–Zn–Mg Alloy

  • Lingying Ye
  • Xuebin Yao
  • Huaqiang Lin
  • Shengdan Liu
  • Yunlai Deng
  • Xinming Zhang
Conference paper

Abstract

The correlation between chemical composition, multiphase microstructure and stress corrosion performance of Al–Zn–Mg alloy with different thickness coarse grain layers was studied by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), tensile test and four point bending stress corrosion performance test. The results indicated that the thickness of coarse grain layer of three kinds of Al–Zn–Mg alloy profiles used in the test were about 200, 400 and 900 μm, while the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance and strength of specimens with coarse grain layer decreased with increase of coarse grain layer thickness. Among different profiles, the stress corrosion cracking resistance of specimens with coarse grain layer and center layer without coarse grain layer exhibited the difference with the change of coarse grain thickness.

Keywords

Al–Zn–Mg alloy Coarse grain layer Stress corrosion cracking 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work is funded by the National Basic Research Program of China (2012CB619500), the Major State Research Program of China (2016YFB0300901), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (51375503) and the BaGui Scholars Program of China’s Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region (2013A017).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lingying Ye
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xuebin Yao
    • 1
    • 2
  • Huaqiang Lin
    • 3
  • Shengdan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yunlai Deng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xinming Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Materials Science and EngineeringCentral South UniversityChangshaChina
  2. 2.Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Nonferrous Structural Materials and ManufacturingChangshaChina
  3. 3.National Engineering Research Center for High-Speed EMU, CRRC Qingdao Sifang Co., Ltd.QingdaoChina

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