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The Epistle as a Pedagogic Text for Educators: Life, Values, and Spirituality for Humanity

  • Orlando Nang Kwok Ho
Chapter

Abstract

This ending chapter has with it three aims. They are:
  1. (1)

    To articulate understandings about a “pedagogical text” and its relationship with the nature of pedagogy for life, values, and spirituality education.

     
  2. (2)

    Begin to anchor these findings in the field of philosophy of education.

     
  3. (3)

    Begin to round up the philosophical and pedagogic investigations and analyses conducted in the previous chapters.

     

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Orlando Nang Kwok Ho
    • 1
  1. 1.The Chartered Institute of LinguistsLondonUK

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