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An Estimation of Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activity of Microalgae

  • C. Premkumar
  • M. Divya
  • N. Krishnaveni
  • P. Santhanam
  • P. Pachiappan
Chapter

Abstract

Algae include a large heterogeneous assemblage of relatively simple plants that have little in common except for their characteristic autotrophic mode of nutrition. Marine microalgae are the rich sources of structurally dynamic and biologically active compounds (Ely et al. 2004). Wide variety of bioactive secondary metabolites has been derived from marine algae for prospective development of novel drugs by the pharmaceutical industries. Marine sources are more active than the other natural sources. Algae have provided a source of inspiration for novel drug compounds for large contributions to human health and well-being. Algal proteins and lipoproteins are found to have antibacterial, antifungal, and antiviral activity (Burja et al. 2001). The compounds produced from algae are of greater interest as a source of safer or more effective substitutes than synthetically produced antimicrobial agent, and they are easily available and cheaper. The first generation of drugs was usually simple botanicals employed in more or less their crude form.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Premkumar
    • 1
  • M. Divya
    • 1
  • N. Krishnaveni
    • 1
  • P. Santhanam
    • 1
  • P. Pachiappan
    • 2
  1. 1.Marine Planktonology & Aquaculture Laboratory, Department of Marine Science, School of Marine SciencesBharathidasan UniversityTiruchirappalliIndia
  2. 2.Department of Biotechnology, School of BiosciencesPeriyar UniversitySalemIndia

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