Personalising Learning: The Teacher Education Context

  • Mellita Jones
  • Karen McLean
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter the teacher education context is examined more closely by looking at effective teacher education, the current teaching and teacher education policy climate in Australia and how personalising learning can assist in addressing the existing policy concerns whilst also providing a quality and effective teacher education experience for its students. The four key tenets of Learners as Central, Information and Communications Technologies (ICT), Communities of Collaboration and Lifelong Learning explored in the previous chapters will be drawn together and considered in light of their strengths and weaknesses and for their capacity to address priorities in teacher education.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mellita Jones
    • 1
  • Karen McLean
    • 1
  1. 1.Australian Catholic UniversityBallaratAustralia

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