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Indoor Environmental Quality of Preparatory to Year 12 (P-12) Educational Facilities in Australia: Challenges and Prospects

Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Climate change is leading to increased frequency, intensity and duration of heatwaves not only in Australia but globally. Children are among those who are most physically vulnerable to the changing climate. Schools buildings and facilities are critical infrastructure which are at risk of the adverse impacts of extreme weather conditions, particularly to the schools’ indoor environments. This chapter reviews the diverse policies on cooling and ventilation in educational facilities across Australia and brings together a multidisciplinary appraisal which can provide starting points for designers, building scientists and policy makers on:
  • Impact of building energy efficiency measures on the thermal comfort, IAQ and ventilation of educational facilities.

  • Health, educational outcomes and economic impacts of thermal comfort, IAQ and ventilation within educational facilities.

  • Australian and best practice international policies, standards and practices applicable to the thermal environment, IAQ and ventilation within P-12 educational facilities.

Notes

Acknowledgements

An earlier and extended version of this chapter was presented in the 2013 report prepared by the authors for the Victorian Department of Education and Early Childhood Development (DEECD), now Victorian Department of Education and Training (DET), who funded the literature review project.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sustainable Building Innovation Laboratory, School of Property Construction and Project ManagementRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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