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[Column] Portosystemic Shuntopathy: This Column Is the Postscript to Chap. 5

  • Atsushi ToyonagaEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Portosystemic shunts including esophagogastric varices are formed in patients with portal hypertension. Esophageal varices do not serve as major shunts, while isolated gastric fundal varices (IGFVs) become major splenorenal shunts. A major shunt is particularly large and has a high shunt ratio. A major splenorenal shunt causes various disease states including classic portosystemic encephalopathy, in other words recurrent hepatic encephalopathy. Although a portosystemic shunt develops as a biological adaptation, excessive portal steal results in liver failure or variceal rupture/bleeding and significantly worsens the prognosis.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kurume University, Yasumoto HospitalKurumeJapan

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