The Arrival of the “Modern” West in Yokohama: Images of the Japanese Experience, 1859–1899

  • Simon James Bytheway
Chapter

Abstract

As the 150th anniversary of the opening of Japan’s treaty ports is celebrated by its citizens, it is appropriate that we also acknowledge the important contribution made by the treaty ports to Japan’s economic development and, more broadly, modernisation. My research aims to uncover the agents and mechanisms, individual and institutional, involved in the transmission of ideas and technology between the newly opened Japan and the industrialised West. In the following study, I would particularly like to discuss some of the most significant images and visual constructs of the treaty ports—the woodblock prints of Yokohama (Yokohama-e)—with their remarkable detail of unprecedented interactions and cooperation, and introduce the concept of wakon yōsai, which is central to understanding Japan’s historic modernisation.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon James Bytheway
    • 1
  1. 1.College of CommerceNihon UniversityTokyoJapan

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