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Indigenous Thought on Indian Traditions in Thailand

  • Amara Srisuchat
Chapter

Abstract

The current archaeological evidence in Thailand suggests that many prehistoric and early historic communities already possessed advanced cultural traditions and technology that would have been inherited by the local inhabitants by the time commercial exchanges with overseas merchants began. Since the advent of the Indians into the land of present-day Thailand in the second century bce, Indian traditions that were expressed through languages, religions and commerce were embraced by indigenous people of Thailand and adapted to their ways of life and socio-cultural development.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amara Srisuchat
    • 1
  1. 1.Fine Arts Department, Ministry of CultureBangkokThailand

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