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Colonization of Large Wildlife in Rehabilitated Forests of Lowland in Chitwan National Park’s Buffer Zone, Nepal

  • G. S. Solanki
  • M. K. Chalise
  • B. K. Sharma
Chapter

Abstract

The study was conducted in community-managed Baghmara buffer zone forest of Chitwan National Park, Nepal, to identify the colonization of large wildlife in rehabilitated forest areas within the protected area system. Total count of animals and review of secondary sources were employed for data analysis. The number of wildlife species recorded in the pre-community-managed phase was five, and their number was increased to ten during post-community-managed forest during this study. The total population of wildlife species recorded was 7 individuals in initial phase in the year 1995 that increased to 365 individuals after 20 years. The number of species and the size of population colonized were barking deer (n = 12), hog deer (n = 2), sambar deer (n = 23), spotted deer (n = 182), wild boar (n = 5), hanuman langur monkey (n = 1), rhesus monkey (n = 76), mugger crocodile (n = 35), tortoise (n = 25), tiger (n = 1), and rhinoceros (n = 3). Density of ungulates increased from 0.5 animal/km2 to 104.2 animals/km2 in post-management phase. There is an increased (P < 0.05) in prey population (ungulates), marsh mugger, and tortoise population in post-management phase.

Keywords

Community forest Wildlife population Rehabilitation Habitat 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation, Nepal, and Baghmara Community Forest, Sauraha, Chitwan, are acknowledged for providing research permission. Thanks to Naresh Subedi and Ram Kumar Aryal for their help in wildlife census. Biodiversity Conservation Center for providing some logistics, Harkaman Lama and Jeevan Lama, field technicians, and Manoj Chaudhari, secretary of BBZCF, were highly acknowledged for the kind support. Local people are acknowledged for providing required information of this study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. S. Solanki
    • 1
  • M. K. Chalise
    • 2
  • B. K. Sharma
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyMizoram UniversityAizawlIndia
  2. 2.Central Department of ZoologyTribhuvan UniversityKathmanduNepal
  3. 3.Biodiversity Coordinator - Conservation Development Foundation (CODEFUND)KathmanduNepal

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