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New Chinese Immigration to New Zealand: Policies, Immigration Patterns, Mobility and Perception

  • Liangni Sally Liu
Chapter

Abstract

The People’s Republic of China (PRC) has remained the second-largest source for residence approvals in New Zealand since 1997. This chapter will provide an overview of this new Chinese immigration flow and its engendered return and re-migration patterns. It will contextualize the new wave of PRC immigration against the background of New Zealand’s changing immigration policy after 1986 and China’s economic and social transformation. It will focus on examining the immigration pathways of the PRC migrants, their general profile and settlement, indicated by participation in the labour market, and their transitional migratory mobility, a theme of research on new Chinese immigration everywhere. The chapter will conclude with a discussion of how new Chinese migrants are perceived by the host society, especially the indigenous Maoris.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liangni Sally Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Massey UniversityAlbanyNew Zealand

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