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The Protected Legal Interests of Crimes Against Humanity and Other Core Crimes Under International Law: A Comparative Analysis

  • Rustam AtadjanovEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International Criminal Justice Series book series (ICJS, volume 22)

Abstract

This chapter deals with comparing the protective scope of crimes under international law (genocide, war crimes and aggression) with protected legal interests of crimes against humanity. The aim here is try to reveal the problematic areas in that scope, and analyze whether and how the conceptual theory of humanness offered in Chap.  4 could be instrumental – or not – in clarifying those problematic elements. In that vein, the chapter first looks at the basic differences between crimes against humanity and other core crimes as those inevitably affect their respective protective scopes. It then moves on to reviewing the exact protected values of each group of core crimes: genocide (three dimensions of interests), war crimes (considerations of humaneness and other values) and the crime of aggression (peace, security and well-being of the world), and to how the proposed conceptual view of humanness helps in clarifying, or otherwise, the protective scopes of crimes under international law.

Keywords

Crimes against humanity Genocide War crimes Crime of aggression Protected interests Peace, security and well-being of the world Considerations of humaneness 

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. Asser Press and the author 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of LawUniversity of HamburgHamburgGermany

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