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Investigation of the Blast Effect in the Electrical Wiring

  • Zoltán NyikesEmail author
  • Tünde Anna Kovács
Conference paper
  • 23 Downloads
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Abstract

In the cities, civilization use many electrical wiring and network cables. The explosion-established high rate energy (as an effect of terrorist attacks) can cause damage in the electrical and communication system. The explosives are different and affect different damage. The wires conduct electricity and the other group the network cables support the communication. Both of them are very important in our urban structure. Without electricity and/or communication (internet), urban life is frozen and it influences the soft targets protections. The metals conductivity, resistance and mechanical properties as a function of the blast attacks can change. These properties are important to ensure continuous service. The goal of the paper is to study the copper cables mechanical and physical properties changing under the blast load.

Keywords

High-energy effect Wiring Blast protection Resistance of wires 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Doctoral School on Safety and Security ScienceÓbuda UniversityBudapestHungary
  2. 2.Bánki Donát Faculty of Mechanical and Safety EngineeringÓbuda UniversityBudapestHungary

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