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Experimental Analysis of Impact and Blast Resistance for Various Built Security Components

  • Leopold KruszkaEmail author
  • Ryszard Rekucki
Conference paper
  • 23 Downloads
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series C: Environmental Security book series (NAPSC)

Abstract

This work is a review of selected own research in the field of resistance of selected built protective components for impacts by projectiles and air blast wave caused by the explosion of explosive material or air-fuel mixture. Background of those research were previously published (Kruszka and Rekucki, Appl Mech Mater 82:422–427, 2011; Kruszka and Rekucki, Resistance analysis of protective doors, windows and built wall to the effect of impact, blast loading and burglary. In: Proceedings of 7th international symposium on impact engineering, 4–7 July 2010. Military University of Technology, Warsaw, pp 421–445, 2010). Experimental bullet-proof investigation results of two types of steel protective doors under the comparative perforation tests using various projectiles shot from short and long typical fire-arms are presented here. The protective windows are tested under a soft impact of 30 kg mass and under an aerial shock wave due to the explosion of an explosive charge and a fuel-air mixture. The structural material of the door glazing, is Polish standard building steel, while the window leaves – Polish architectural protective glass of P4A class and duplex hardened glass.

Keywords

Experimental testing Blast Impact Protective doors and windows 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Civil Engineering and GeodesyMilitary University of TechnologyWarsawPoland

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