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Reflections on the Legacy of Nelson Mandela and the Relevance for Educational Transformation Globally

  • Diane Brook NapierEmail author
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Part of the Globalisation, Comparative Education and Policy Research book series (GCEP, volume 20)

Abstract

This chapter offers reflections on selections of Mr. Mandela’s words, with reference to their relevance for the path taken for educational reform and transformation in general in South Africa. Examples of pedagogical approaches reported by Jansen (2009) and Soudien et al. (2015) who illustrated the manner in which some elements of Mr. Mandela’s message might be operationalised to inspire students to engage in self-reflection and reconciliation in educational settings. The chapter offer analysis of the two aspects of concern over the vulnerability of Mr. Mandela’s legacy. First, in the so-called “born free” generation, the post-apartheid generation of South Africans whose profile reveals significant evidence of how many more “hills to climb” there are in the overall route to transformation in South Africa. Secondly, is Mr. Mandela’s legacy vulnerable to political expediency and to societal amnesia?

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Comparative and International EducationUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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