Advertisement

On the Roof of the World, the Herders of the Tibetan Plateau Confronted by Change

  • Ruijun LongEmail author
  • Xiao Jing Qi
  • Luming Ding
  • Tingting Yang
  • Thierry Bonaudo
  • Bernard Hubert
  • Jean-François Tourrand
Chapter

Located in the north-eastern part of the Tibetan Plateau along the Silk Road, the Qilian Mountains have experienced a turbulent recent history. This has been due, on the one hand, to the changing political context resulting from the Chinese Revolution of 1949 and, on the other, to the priority accorded by the public authorities to all of its lands and rangelands, of which the Qilian Mountains are a part. Indeed, depending on the qualification and the source, rangelands account for 40–65% of the country’s surface area, i.e., 4–6.5 million km2, mainly in the north and west (Hu and Zhang 2001; Ren et al. 2008). For China, the importance of these rangelands arises from the fact that they are a great water tower as well as rich in various sub-soil minerals (uranium, lithium, etc.) and hydrocarbons, two characteristics essential to the country’s industrial, agricultural and economic development. The rangelands are also a vast pastoral area, used mainly by minority ethnic groups, especially...

References

  1. Hu Z, Zhang D (2001) Country pasture/forage resource profiles: China. FAO, RomeGoogle Scholar
  2. Huang Y (1996) Inflation and investment controls in China. The political economy of central-local relations during the reform era. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 396 pGoogle Scholar
  3. Liu Y, Baas S, Ni H (2001) Strengthening pastoral institution in North-West China pastoral area to access improved extension services for risk management and poverty alleviation. Report FAO-MOA/CIADGoogle Scholar
  4. Long RJ (2003) Alpine rangeland ecosystem and their management in the Qinghai – Tibetan Plateau. In: Wiener G, Jianlin H, Long R (eds) The Yak, 2nd edn. FAO/RAP, Bangkok, pp 359–388Google Scholar
  5. Long RJ, Ding LM, Shang ZH, Guo XH (2008) The yak grazing system in the Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and its status. Rangeland J 30:241–246CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Longworth JW, Williamson GJ (1993) China’s pastoral region: sheep and wool, minority nationalities, rangeland degradation and sustainable development. CABI International Ed, Oxford, 368 pGoogle Scholar
  7. Morses S, McNamara N, Acholo M (2007) Sustainable livelihood approach. A critical analysis of theory and practice. Geographical paper, 189. The University of Reading, ReadingGoogle Scholar
  8. Ren JZ, Hu ZZ, Zhao J, Zhang DG, Hou FJ, Lin HL, Mu XD (2008) A grassland classification system and its application in China. Rangeland J 30:199–210CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Small LA (2007) The sustainable rural livelihoods approach: a critical review. Can J Dev Stud 28(1):27–38CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Tabouret S (2009) Les montagnes du Qilian: un élevage pastoral et agropastoral contraint par l’accès aux ressources fourragères locales. Diplôme ingénieur agronome. IRC, Montpellier, 130 pGoogle Scholar
  11. Wang MP, Zhao CZ, Long RJ, Yang YH (2010) Rangeland governance in China: overview, impacts on Sunan County in Gansu Province and future options. Rangeland J 32:155–163CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. World Bank (2001) China – air, land and water: environment priorities for a new millennium. The World Bank, Washington, DC, 149 pCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Éditions Quæ 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruijun Long
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xiao Jing Qi
    • 1
  • Luming Ding
    • 1
  • Tingting Yang
    • 1
  • Thierry Bonaudo
    • 2
  • Bernard Hubert
    • 3
  • Jean-François Tourrand
    • 4
  1. 1.International Center for Tibetan Plateau Ecosystem Management (ICTPEM)Lanzhou UniversityLanzhouChina
  2. 2.AgroParisTechParisFrance
  3. 3.AgropolisMontpellierFrance
  4. 4.CIRADMontpellierFrance

Personalised recommendations