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Swelling Behavior of Organic-Inorganic Ureasil-Based Polymers

  • T. S. Kavetskyy
  • H. Švajdlenková
  • Y. Kukhazh
  • O. Šauša
  • K. Čechová
  • I. Mat’ko
  • N. Hoivanovych
  • O. Dytso
  • T. Petkova
  • V. Boev
  • V. Ilcheva
Conference paper
Part of the NATO Science for Peace and Security Series B: Physics and Biophysics book series (NAPSB)

Abstract

The swelling behavior of pure ureasil and ureasil-chalcogenide glass composites of different history (fresh, aged and thermally heated) was examined using ethyl alcohol. Swelling experiments showed the structure of the network of samples aged for 1 year after preparation has a lower swelling ability compared with pure ureasil as well with the composite, but the effect is more expressed for the pure polymer. In the cases of a thermally heated pure ureasil sample and a more than 5 years after preparation aged sample of the composite, the structure network has practically the same swelling ability as the fresh pure ureasil and the composite samples. It is suggested that one of the factors influencing the swelling is the change of the basic ureasil network due to aging and/or thermal heating.

Keywords

Swelling Organic-inorganic hybrid Polymer Composite Ureasil 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was financially supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine (projects Nos. 0116U004737, 0117U007142 (for Young Scientists) and 0117U007143; to TK and YK), by the Slovak Grant Agency VEGA (project No. 2/0157/17; to OS and project No. 2/0127/17; to IM), by the Slovak Research and Development Agency (project No. APVV-16-0369; to HS, OS, KC and IM) and by the National Science Fund of the Bulgarian Ministry of Education (project No. FNI-DN09/12-2016; to TK, TP, VB and VI).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. S. Kavetskyy
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Švajdlenková
    • 3
  • Y. Kukhazh
    • 1
  • O. Šauša
    • 4
  • K. Čechová
    • 4
  • I. Mat’ko
    • 4
  • N. Hoivanovych
    • 1
  • O. Dytso
    • 1
  • T. Petkova
    • 5
  • V. Boev
    • 5
  • V. Ilcheva
    • 5
  1. 1.Drohobych Ivan Franko State Pedagogical UniversityDrohobychUkraine
  2. 2.The John Paul II Catholic University of LublinLublinPoland
  3. 3.Polymer Institute, Slovak Academy of SciencesBratislavaSlovak Republic
  4. 4.Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of SciencesBratislavaSlovak Republic
  5. 5.Institute of Electrochemistry and Energy Systems, Bulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria

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