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Women As Actors in Addressing Climate Change

  • Yves Charbit
Chapter
Part of the International Handbooks of Population book series (IHOP, volume 8)

Abstract

This chapter first argues that gender inequalities lead to a gender-differentiated impact of climate change. Women are more affected by the frequency and intensity of disasters; scarcity of natural resources increases their working time, makes their living conditions precarious and aggravates inequalities; climate change increases health problems and impacts the sexual and reproductive rights of women. Second, women are insufficiently recognized as actors of sustainable development and of the fight against climate change, although they play an essential role in the production of prevention, adaptation and mitigation strategies in the face of climate change; however their contribution is little known, underestimated and undervalued in the roll-out of large-scale national public policies; last, they do not have equal access to funding assigned to the fight against climate change. Third, strengthening gender equality and women’s empowerment is viewed as a strategy to combat climate change that will improve population resilience and contribute to sustainable development policies locally and nationally.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yves Charbit
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University Paris DescartesParisFrance
  2. 2.School of AnthropologyOxford UniversityOxfordUK

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