The Fundamental Human Right to Health, Safety and Well-Being

  • Aditya Jain
  • Stavroula Leka
  • Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot
Chapter
Part of the Aligning Perspectives on Health, Safety and Well-Being book series (AHSW)

Abstract

As calls for enterprises to be more socially responsible increase, issues relating to health, safety and well-being (HSW) at work are being gradually seen as fundamental human rights as well as essential components of responsible business practices. Human rights initiatives are increasingly used by companies and their stakeholders as the normative framework for social aspects of sustainability. Although the human rights discourse is a useful and increasingly utilized tool for responding to growing global inequalities, until recently its explicit use in HSW research and policy development has been relatively uncommon. In this chapter, we discuss how employee HSW can be addressed through a human rights-based approach to be further embedded in business operations and practices. In 2008, the Seoul Declaration on Safety and Health at Work explicitly linked workers’ HSW with human rights. The Declaration highlights that the protection of the worker against sickness, disease and injury arising out of his employment is not only a labour right but a fundamental human right. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights has been another key development in the challenge of creating a global business responsibility and sustainability promise.

Keywords

Human rights Fundamental rights Health, safety and well-being Business responsibility 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aditya Jain
    • 1
  • Stavroula Leka
    • 2
  • Gerard I. J. M. Zwetsloot
    • 3
    • 2
  1. 1.Nottingham University Business School and Centre for Organizational Health and DevelopmentUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  2. 2.Centre for Organizational Health and DevelopmentUniversity of NottinghamNottinghamUK
  3. 3.Gerard Zwetsloot Research & ConsultancyAmsterdamThe Netherlands

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