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Tibet under Pressure, 1954–1959

  • George Ginsburgs
  • Michael Mathos

Abstract

The development which provided the aforementioned landmark in the post-1951 progression of Sino-Tibetan relations was the inaugural session of Communist China’s National People’s Congress and what transpired on that important occasion.

Keywords

State Council Chinese Communist Party National People National Minority Tibetan Autonomous Region 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    V. Kassis, Vosemdesyat dnei v Tibete(Moscow, 1956), p. 87; also, New York Times, March 13, 1955, p. 1.Google Scholar
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    Asian Recorder, 1957, pp. 1506, 1571. A retrenchment committee was set up by the Preparatory Committee to study the measures for carrying out the new line, headed by KalonNgaboo, aided by 2 vice-chairmen, and comprising 44 members. On that occasion Chang Kuo-hua made the unusual admission that “judging from the situation during the past year, it was, however, found that conditions for democratic reforms in Tibet were not yet mature. Only the minority, not the majority, of the people of upper strata are in agreement of carrying out the reforms. The aspiration of the masses of the people in the reforms is definite, but their awareness is still low.” CB, No. 490, February 7, 1958, pp. 1–2.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Ginsburgs
    • 1
  • Michael Mathos
    • 2
  1. 1.State University of IowaUSA
  2. 2.Planning Research CorporationUSA

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