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GM-CSF — Biochemical purification and molecular and biologic characterization

  • Ann Jakubowski
Chapter

Abstract

Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is one of the original ‘colony-stimulating factors’, whose name is derived from its major target cell lineages (Table 1). Since the original studies, which characterized its ability to stimulate the clonal proliferation of myeloid precursors, however, a broader range of biologic effects on mature, effector cells, and the immune system, have been identified. These expanded areas of activity have carried its more recent clinical application beyond that of ‘colony stimulating factor’ into the realm of immunomodulation.

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© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2003

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  • Ann Jakubowski

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