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A Divide-and-Conquer Method for Inverse Kinematics of Hyper-Redundant Manipulators

  • Yunfeng Wang
  • Gregory S. Chirikjian
Chapter

Abstract

Hyper-redundant manipulators have a large number of redundant degrees of freedom. They have been recognized as a means to improve manipulator performance in complex and unstructured environments. However, the high degree of redundancy also causes difficulty in inverse kinematics calculations. Motivated by the cascading of workspace densities, this paper develops a “divide-and-conquer” method for inverse kinematics using the workspace density generated by a partial differential equation. This method does not involve a high dimensional Jacobian matrix and offers high accuracy. Its computational complexity is only O(log 2 P) for a manipulator with P modules. Numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate this method.

Keywords

Inverse Kinematics Hyper-Redundant Manipulator Workspace Density 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yunfeng Wang
    • 1
  • Gregory S. Chirikjian
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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