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Systemic Acquired Resistance in Tobacco: Use of Transgenic Expression to Study the Functions of Pathogenesis-Related Proteins

  • Danny Alexander
  • Christopher Glascock
  • Julie Pear
  • Jeffrey Stinson
  • Patricia Ahl-Goy
  • Manuella Gut-Rella
  • Eric Ward
  • Robert M. Goodman
  • John Ryals
Chapter
Part of the Current Plant Science and Biotechnology in Agriculture book series (PSBA, volume 14)

Abstract

Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR) is the resistance to a variety of fungal, bacterial, and viral pathogens induced in many plant species by prior inoculation with a necrotizing pathogen. While the mechanism of resistance is unclear, there is a strong correlation in tobacco between the resistant state and the presence of the so-called “Pathogenesis-Related proteins” (PR-proteins). To study the involvement of the PR-proteins in SAR, we have engaged in a comprehensive program to clone and express constitutively in tobacco the cDNAs for all the PR-proteins. In addition to cloning the well-described PR 1–5 gene families, we have used differential cDNA screening to clone several new gene families which are induced by TMV inoculation. Homozygous transgenic seed lines expressing the various genes (or their anti-sense transcripts) are tested against a battery of pathogens for altered disease phenotypes. We have determined that transgenic plants expressing constitutively tobacco PR1 protein show significant resistance to blue mold (Peronosopra tabacino). The resistance, exhibited as a delay in symptom development, is observed in several independent transgenic PR1 lines, as well as in F1 crosses with a PR1 transgenic line as parent. Lines expressing the eDNA of a newly defined induced gene, denoted SAR8.2d, exhibit resistance to another oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora parasitica. As with the PR1 resistance, multiple transgenic events show the resistance, which is observed as much delayed symptom development.

Keywords

Tobacco Mosaic Virus Systemic Acquire Resistance Oomycete Pathogen Blue Mold Phytophthora Parasitica 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Danny Alexander
    • 1
  • Christopher Glascock
    • 1
  • Julie Pear
    • 1
  • Jeffrey Stinson
    • 1
  • Patricia Ahl-Goy
    • 3
  • Manuella Gut-Rella
    • 3
  • Eric Ward
    • 4
  • Robert M. Goodman
    • 1
    • 2
  • John Ryals
    • 4
  1. 1.Calgene, Inc.DavisUSA
  2. 2.Univ of WisconsinMadisonUSA
  3. 3.CIBA-GEIGY Ltd.BasleSwitzerland
  4. 4.CIBA-GEIGY BiotechnologyUSA

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