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The Revolt and its Aftermath

  • George Ginsburgs
  • Michael Mathos

Abstract

The sequence of the March, 1959, events in and around Lhasa and of several of the more spectacular accompanying developments, such as the flight of the Dalai Lama and his entourage to India, is by now sufficiently well known not to require further repetition. There may still be some controversy on matters of fact or interpretation of particular points in the history of the crisis, which could remain disputed forever, but the general picture of what happened is no longer in doubt, allowing one to draw the necessary conclusions therefrom with little danger of falling into serious error due to the lack of a piece of vital data. Instead of another chronological recitation of the various steps leading to the final outbreak and of a blow-by-blow account of the short-lived revolt itself, therefore, an attempt will here be made to analyze the main elements of the uprising from the standpoint of the forces involved, the chief issues at stake, and the long-range consequences for Tibet of the outcome of this showdown, so to speak, given its specific causes and the character of the actors in the drama.

Keywords

Bank Saving Democratic Election Democratic Reform Agricultural District Peasant Household 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Martinus Nijhoff, The Hague, Netherlands 1964

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Ginsburgs
    • 1
  • Michael Mathos
    • 2
  1. 1.State University of IowaUSA
  2. 2.Planning Research CorporationUSA

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