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Aging

  • Frederick Sierles

Abstract

Aging (senescence) is a gradual decline in physiological functioning as the years progress. It is debatable whether it begins with birth or in adulthood, and its causes are not known for sure. The decline in function varies in degree from individual to individual, and competence or excellence in behavior or other physiological functioning can be maintained by some at any age. For example, Slater and Roth [1] list da Vinci, Titian, Durer, Michelangelo, Voltaire, Goethe, Verdi, Renoir, and Picasso as examples of “artistic genius that continued to flower in old age.”

Keywords

Nursing Home Geriatric Patient Pernicious Anemia Physiological Functioning Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Spectrum Publications 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick Sierles

There are no affiliations available

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