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Tribological and Thermal Ceramic Coatings for Advanced Adiabatic Engine

  • Roy Kamo
  • Walter Bryzik
Chapter

Abstract

Tribological and thermal ceramic coatings have been developed for cost effective applications in future advanced adiabatic engines. Tribological ceramic coatings which have been investigated for friction and wear are: Cr2O3, CrC, Si3N4, ZrO2, SiC, Al2O3, etc. Thermal coatings studied are ZrO2, chrome oxide, and cermets. Thermal fatigue tests were also conducted on the coatings. Selection of the best ceramic coatings were made for the ceramic coated adiabatic engine. Engine components such as cylinder liners, cylinder heads, and piston crown were coated and tested on an aluminum and iron diesel engine. A 400 hour NATO test and other stringent durability tests were conducted with satisfactory results. The uncooled adiabatic ceramic coated engine installed in a vehicle has delivered fuel economy improvements of 11 to 37%. The ceramic coatings are based on a chemical thermal bonded slurry which is cured in a furnace before use. It can be applied onto aluminum, steel, titanium, and other metallic substrates.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers Ltd and MPA Stuttgart 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy Kamo
    • 1
  • Walter Bryzik
    • 2
  1. 1.Adiabatics, Inc.ColumbusUSA
  2. 2.U.S. Army TACOMWarrenUSA

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