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Characterization of Pressureless Sintered Alpha SiC by Advanced Techniques of Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction

  • A. Camanzi
  • B. A. De Angelis
  • G. Giunta
  • S. Loreti
  • C. Rizzo
  • P. Alessandrini
Chapter

Abstract

Sintered alpha-SiC has been investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM] and X-Fay diffraction (XRD]. By using channeling contrast effects produced when SEM is operating with low beam energy and high current density, grain size and shape, boron and carbon inclusions, porosity are identified on the same surface without chemical or thermal etching of the samples. From XRD data, by applying the Rietveld method, the weight percentage of SiC polytypes has been evaluated without using standard powder mixtures of alpha-SiC. The percentage of the 4H polytype has been studied as a function of the sintering temperature and has been tentatively related to the presence of exaggerately grown grains.

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Copyright information

© Elsevier Science Publishers Ltd and MPA Stuttgart 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Camanzi
    • 1
  • B. A. De Angelis
    • 1
  • G. Giunta
    • 1
  • S. Loreti
    • 1
  • C. Rizzo
    • 1
  • P. Alessandrini
    • 1
  1. 1.ENIRICERCHE S.p.A.RomeItaly

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