Advertisement

Commission des Observations Astronomiques Au-Dehors de L’Atmosphere Terrestre

  • L. Goldberg
Conference paper
Part of the International Astronomical Union Transactions book series (IAUT, volume 13B)

Abstract

Many important advances in the techniques of space astronomy have occurred since the last General Assembly. The most widely publicized developments have been those connected with the exploration of the Moon and Mars, where the exploits of such spacecraft as Luna, Zond, Surveyor, Lunar Orbiter and Mariner in revealing the details of the lunar and Martian landscapes have seemed little short of miraculous. The photographs obtained during these flights have already been extensively disseminated and the results of more detailed analysis are best left to Commissions 16 and 17. Although the lunar and planetary developments have been of the highest scientific importance, the space program has also had a number of other successes of equal scientific significance, although characterized by a much more modest scale of engineering achievement. Many types of satellites and space probes have provided detailed measurements of the interplanetary plasma and its associated magnetic fields. The discovery of a sizable number of extra-solar X-ray sources has already established a new branch of astronomy, which has attracted numerous experimenters and captured the attention of many theoretical physicists. Far ultraviolet stellar spectra have been photographed for the first time, both from sounding rockets and with cameras operated by astronauts in the Gemini spacecraft. Solar X-ray astronomy has also advanced very rapidly. X-ray photographs of the Sun are approaching in resolution those made in visible light. Solar X-ray spectra now reveal emission lines down to a wavelength of 6Å and seem to defy all limitations imposed by ‘reasonable’ coronal temperatures.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

Bibliography

  1. 1.
    Steinberg, J. L., Ed. IAU Symposium No. 23, Astronomical Observations from Space Vehicles. Reprinted from Ann. Astrophys., 1964, 27, no. 6 and 1965, 28, nos. 1, 2, 3, 4.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Space Research, Directions for the Future. Part 2, Solar Astronomy. National Academy of Sciences — National Research Council, Wash., D.C., Jan. 1966.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tousey, R., Austin, W. E., Purcell, J. D., Widing, K. G. 1965, The extreme ultraviolet emission from the Sun between the Lyman-alpha lines of Hi and C vi, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 755 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium no. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Allen, C. W. 1965, The interpretation of the XUV solar spectrum, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 91.ADSGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Pottasch, S. R. 1964, On the interpretation of the solar ultraviolet emission line spectrum, Space Sci. Rev., 3, 816.ADSGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Mandel’Shtam, S. L. 1965, X-ray emission of the Sun, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 587.ADSGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Rense, W. A. 1966, Techniques for rocket solar UV and for UV spectroscopy, Space Sci. Rev., 5, 234.ADSGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Boyd, R. L. F. 1965, Techniques for the measurement of extra-terrestrial soft X-radiation, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 35.ADSGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Smith, R. A. 1965, Detectors for ultraviolet, visible, and infrared radiation, Appl. Opt., 4, 631ADSGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Hinteregger, H. E. 1965, Absolute intensity measurements in the extreme ultraviolet spectrum of solar radiation, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 461.ADSGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Higashino, I., Masuoka, T., Hisada, H., Sasanuma, M., Oshio, T. 1966, An observation of solar XUV radiation by ionization chambers, Mem. of the Faculty of Engineering, Osaka City Univ., 8.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Black, W. S., Booker, D., Burton, W. M., Jones, B. B., Shenton, D. B., Wilson, R. 1965, Solar spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet using stabilized Skylark rockets, Nature, 206, 654.ADSGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Burton, W. M., Wilson, R. 1965, Observations of the Sun in the extreme ultraviolet from a stabilized Skylark rocket, Nature, 207, 61.ADSGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Burton, W. M., Ridgely, A., Wilson, R. 1966, The ultraviolet emission spectrum of the solar chromosphere and corona. Preprint CLM-P109, Culham Laboratory. Submitted to Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Hinteregger, H. E., Hall, L. A., Schweizer, W. 1964, Solar XUV-spectrum from 310Â-55Â, Astrophys. J., 140, 319.ADSGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Hall, L. A., Schweizer, W., Heroux, L., Hinteregger, H. E. 1965, Solar XUV spectrum of March, 1964, Astrophys. J., 142, 13.ADSGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Hall, L. A., Schweizer, W., Hinteregger, H. E. 196s, Long-term variation of solar extreme ultraviolet fluxes, J. geophys. Res., 70, 2241.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Austin, W. E., Purcell, J. D., Tousey, R., Widing, K. G. 1966, Coronal emission line intensities in the extreme ultraviolet, Astrophys. J., 145, 373.ADSGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Hinteregger, H. E., Hall, L. A. Schmidtke, G. 1965, Solar XUV radiation and neutral particle distribution in July 1963 thermosphere, Space Res., 5, 1175.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Blake, R. L., Chubb, T. A., Friedman, H., Unzicker, A. E. 1965, Spectral and photometric measurements of solar X-ray emission below 60Â, Astrophys. J., 142, 1.ADSGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Zhitnik, I. A., Krutov, V. V., Malyavkin, L. P., MandeFShtam, S. L., Cheremukhin, G. S. (in press).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Culhane, J. L., Willmore, A. P., Pounds, K. A., Sanford, P. W. 1964, Variability of the solar X-ray spectrum below 15Â, Space Res., 4, 741.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Fredga, K. 1966, Monochromatic pictures of the Sun in the Mg 11 line at 2802.7 Â, Astrophys. J., 144, 854.ADSGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Sloan, W. A. 1966, Rocket measurements of the solar surface in the light of Lyman alpha, 1216Â, Astr. J., 71, 399.ADSGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Purcell, J. D., Tousey, R., Widing, K. G. Some new extreme ultraviolet spectroheliograms, paper presented at AAS Special Meeting on Solar Astronomy, Boulder, Colorado, 3 - 5 Oct. 1966.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    Purcell, J. D., Tousey, R. XUV heliograms, paper presented at A AS Special Meeting on Solar Astronomy, Boulder, Colorado, 3 - 5 Oct. 1966.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    Zhitnik, I. A., Krutov, V. V., Malyaukin, L. P., Mandel’Shtam, S. L. 1964, Solar images in the far ultraviolet part of the spectrum, Cosmic Res., 2, 801, translated from Kosm. Issled., 2, 920, 1964.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    Russell, P. C. 1965, Soft X-ray image of the Sun, Nature, 205, 684.ADSGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Russell, P. C. 1965, Further soft X-ray images of the Sun, Nature, 208, 281.ADSGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Russell, P. C., Pounds, K. A. 1966, Improved resolution X-ray photographs of the Sun, Nature, 209, 490.ADSGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Giacconi, R., Reidy, W. P., Zehnpfennig, T., Lindsay, J. C., Muney, W. S. 1965, Solar X-ray images obtained using grazing incidence optics, Astrophys. J., 142, 1274.ADSGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Underwood, J. H., Muney, W. S. X-ray photographs of the solar corona, paper presented at AAS Special Meeting on Solar Astronomy, Boulder, Colorado, 3 - 5 Oct. 1966.Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Thomas, L. 1964, Observations of solar X-ray emission in the band 44-60Â from U.S. Naval Research Laboratory satellite 1963-21-C, Nature, 203, 962.ADSGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Kreplin, R. W. 1965, NRL solar radiation monitoring satellite: description of instrumentation and preliminary results, Space Res., 5, 951.Google Scholar
  35. 35.
    Thomas, L., Venables, F. H., Williams, K. M. 1965, Measurements of solar X-ray fluxes by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory satellite 1964-01-D, Planet. Space Sci., 13, 807.ADSGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Landini, M., Piattelli, M., Righini, G., Russo, D., Tagliaferri, G. L. 1964, Some preliminary results from the solar monitoring satellite NRL 1964 1 D obtained at the Arcetri station, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 765 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  37. 37.
    Friedman, H. Monitoring of X-rays by Solrad-8 (1965-16-D), Report of Seventh CO SPAR Space Science Symposium, Vienna, Austria 1966.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Van Allen, J. A., Frank, L. A., Maehlum, B., Acton, L. W. 1965, Solar X-ray observations by Injun 1, J. geophys. Res., 70, 1639.ADSGoogle Scholar
  39. 39.
    Lindsay, J. C. 1965, Comments on X-rays emitted by the Sun, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 586 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    White, W. A. 1964, Space Res., 4, 771.Google Scholar
  41. 41.
    Frost, K. J. 1965, Comments on high energy X-ray bursts observed by OSO-i, Space Res., 5, 513.Google Scholar
  42. 42.
    Conner, J. P., Evans, W. D., Montgomery, M. D., Singer, S., Stogsdill, E. E. 1965, Solar flare X-ray emission measurements, Space Res., 5, 546. Singer, S., Conner, J. P., Evans, W. D., Montgomery, M. D., Stogsdill, E. E. 1965, and Plasma observations at 105 km, Space Res., 5, 546.Google Scholar
  43. 43.
    Bowen, P. J., Norman, K., Pounds, K. A., Sanford, P. W., Willmore, A. P. 1964, Measurements of the solar spectrum in the wavelength band 4 to 14 Â, Proc. R. Soc. London Ser. A, 281, 538.ADSGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Pounds, K. A. 1965, Recent solar X-ray studies in the United Kingdom, Ann. Astrophys 28, 132 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Tindo, I. P. 1965, Investigation of Cosmic Space, Nauka, Moscow.Google Scholar
  46. 46.
    Kurnosova, L. V., Mandel’Shtam, S. L., Razorenov, L. A., Tindo, I. P., Fradkin, M. I. 1966, Kosm. Issled., 4, 170.Google Scholar
  47. 47.
    Frost, K. J., Rothe, E. D., Peterson, L. E. 1966, A search for the quiet-time solar gamma rays from balloon altitudes, J. geophys. Res., 71, 4079.ADSGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    Peterson, L. E., Schwartz, D. A., Pelling, R. M., McKenzie, D. 1966, The upper limit solar gamma-ray spectrum to 10 MeV, J. geophys. Res., 71, 5778.ADSGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    Beer, R. 1966. Decrement of the solar continuum in the far infrared, Nature, 209, 1226.ADSGoogle Scholar
  50. 50.
    Deutsch, A. J., Righini, G. 1964, An airborne observation of the coronal spectrum at the eclipse of 20 July, 1963, Astrophys. J., 140, 313.ADSGoogle Scholar
  51. 51.
    Blackwell, D. E., Petford, A. D. 1966, Observations of the 1963 July 20 solar eclipse. I. Spectroscopic separation of the F and K components of the solar corona at large distances from the Sun, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 131, 383.ADSGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    Gillett, F. C., Stein, W. A., Ney, E. P. 1964, Observations of the solar corona from the limb of the Sun to the zodiacal light, July 20, 1963, Astrophys. J., 140, 292.ADSGoogle Scholar
  53. 53.
    Newkirk, G., Jr., Bohlin, J. D. 1965, Coronascope II: Observation of the white light corona from a stratospheric balloon, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 234 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    Bohlin, J. D., Hansen, R. T., Newkirk, G. A. The three dimensional structure of a coronal streamer and the inner solar wind, paper presented at AAS Special Meeting on Solar Astronomy, Boulder, Colorado, 1 - 3 Oct. 1966.Google Scholar
  55. 55.
    Tousey, R. 1965, Observations of the white light corona by rocket, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 600 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Koomen, M. J., Purcell, J. D., Tousey, R. The white light corona from jR = 4 to 11 jR. Paper presented at AAS Special Meeting on Solar Astronomy, Boulder, Colorado, 1 - 3 Oct. 1966.Google Scholar
  57. 57.
    Liebenberg, D. H. Coronal emission line profiles of A5303 obtained at the 30 May 1965 total solar eclipse, paper presented at 123rd meeting of the Amer. Astr. Soc., Los Angeles, 27 - 30 Dec. 1966.Google Scholar
  58. 58.
    Gunn, J. E., Norton, R. H. Surveyor I observations of the solar corona, paper presented at AAS Special Meeting on Solar Astronomy, Boulder, Colorado, 1 - 3 Oct. 1966.Google Scholar
  59. 59.
    Tanabe, H., Huruhata, M. In preparation.Google Scholar
  60. 60.
    Ney, E. P., Huch, W. F. 1966, Observations of the sky, Earth, and airglow from OSOB, Astr. J., 71, 393 (also in AAS Meeting, Hampton, Virginia, March 1966 ).Google Scholar
  61. 61.
    Sinanoglu, O., Skutnik, B., Tousey, R. 1966, Search for quarks in the far ultraviolet solar spectrum, Phys. Rev. Lett., 17, 785.ADSGoogle Scholar
  62. 62.
    Bennett, W. R., Jr. 1966, Detection of quarks in the ultraviolet solar spectrum. Phys. Rev. Lett. 17, 1196.ADSGoogle Scholar
  63. 63.
    Alexander, E., Feldman, U., Fraenkel, B. S. 1964, A method of differentiating between atomic spectra of high degrees of ionization, J. quantit. Spectrosc. radiat. Transfer, 4, 501,Google Scholar
  64. 64.
    Feldman, U., Fraenkel, B. S. 1966, Unclassified 3p6 3d~3p5 3d 4S transition lines of Fe vin, Mn vu, and Cr vi, Astrophys. J., 145, 959.ADSGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    Fawcett, B. C., Gabriel, A. H., Irons, F. E., Peacock, N. J., Saunders, P. A. H. 1966, Extreme ultra-violet spectra from laser-produced plasmas, Proc. Phys. Soc., 88, 1051.ADSGoogle Scholar
  66. 66.
    Deutschman, W. A., House, L. L. 1966, New inner-shell resonance lines in highly ionized sulfur and chlorine, Astrophys. J., 144, 435.ADSGoogle Scholar
  67. 67.
    House, L. L., Deutschman, W. A., Sawyer, G. A. 1964, Comparison of solar and laboratory iron spectra in the vacuum ultraviolet, Astrophys. J., 140, 814.ADSGoogle Scholar
  68. 68.
    Elton, R. C., Kolb, A. C., Austin, W. E., Tousey, R., Widing, K. 1964, Origin of certain solar emission lines between 170 and 220Â, Astrophys. J., 140, 390.ADSGoogle Scholar
  69. 69.
    House, L. L. 1964, The laboratory production of solar iron lines in the vacuum ultraviolet, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 763 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).Google Scholar
  70. 70.
    MandePShtam, S. L., Fedoseyev, S. P., Kononov, E. Ya., Lebedév, S. V. 1965, Laboratory reproduction of the short-wavelength portion of the solar spectrum, Optics Spectrosc., 18, 522.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Gabriel, A. H., Fawcett, B. C., Jordan, C. 1965, Classification of iron lines in the spectrum of the Sun and Zeta in the range 167Â to 220Â, Nature, 206, 390.ADSGoogle Scholar
  72. 72.
    Fawcett, B. C., Gabriel, A. H. 1965, New spectra of the iron transition elements of astrophysical interest, Astrophys. J., 141, 343.ADSGoogle Scholar
  73. 73.
    Gabriel, A. H., Fawcett, B. C., Jordan, C. 1966, Classification of iron vin to xn and xiv lines in the solar XUV spectrum and their isoelectronic sequences from argon to nickel, Proc. phys. Soc., 87, 825.ADSGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    Fawcett, B. C., Gabriel, A. H. 1966, Spectra from 3pn — 33d transitions of iron period elements in CI 1 and S 1 isoelectronic sequences, Proc. phys. Soc., 88, 262.ADSGoogle Scholar
  75. 75.
    Feldman, U., Fraenkel, B. S., Hoory, S. 1965, Identifications of solar ultraviolet lines resulting from a study of the Ar 1 and K 1 isoelectronic sequences, Astrophys. J., 142, 719.ADSGoogle Scholar
  76. 76.
    Alexander, E., Feldman, U., Fraenkel, B. S., Hoory, S. 1965, 3p% — 3p5 3d transitions of Fe ix and Nixi in the solar spectrum, Nature, 206, 175.ADSGoogle Scholar
  77. 77.
    Cowan, R. D., Peacock, N. J. 1965, Identification of some intense iron lines in the solar spectrum near 170Â, Astrophys. J., 142, 390.ADSGoogle Scholar
  78. 78.
    Gabriel, A. H., Fawcett, B. C. 1965, Identification of the solar spectrum in the region 60-170 Â, Nature, 208, 808.ADSGoogle Scholar
  79. 79.
    Zirin, H. 1964, Identification of extreme ultraviolet solar emission lines, Astrophys. J., 140, 1332.ADSGoogle Scholar
  80. 80.
    Neupert, W. M. 1965, Intensity variations in the solar extreme ultraviolet spectrum observed by OSO-i, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 446 (also in 1964, I AU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  81. 81.
    Neupert, W. M., Smith, E. V. P. 1964, Possible identification of permitted Fe xiv lines in the extreme ultraviolet solar spectrum, Astr. J., 69, 554 (also in 1964, paper presented at 116th meeting AAS, Flagstaff).ADSGoogle Scholar
  82. 82.
    Stockhausen, R. 1965, The UV lines of Fe xiv in the solar corona, Astrophys. J., 141, 277.ADSGoogle Scholar
  83. 83.
    Goldberg, L., Parkinson, W. H., Reeves, E. M. 1965, Carbon monoxide in the ultraviolet solar spectrum, Astrophys. J., 141, 1293.ADSGoogle Scholar
  84. 84.
    Porter, J. R., Tilford, S. G., Widing, K. G. Carbon monoxide in the solar ultraviolet spectrum (in press).Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    Rich, J. C., Gingerich, O. 1966, Metallic continuous absorption coefficients in the solar ultraviolet, Astr. J., 71, 161.ADSGoogle Scholar
  86. 86.
    Rich, J. C. Silicon and carbon monoxide absorption in the solar ultraviolet spectrum, Ph.D. Thesis, Harvard University, Nov. 1966.Google Scholar
  87. 87.
    Lacis, A. A., Matsushima, S. 1965, Method of correction for instrumental broadening to determine the solar ultraviolet limb-darkening, Astr. J., 70, 142 (also in 1964, paper presented at 117th meeting AAS, Montreal).ADSGoogle Scholar
  88. 88.
    Withbroe, G. L. 1966, Theoretical profiles for the solar auto-ionization lines of A11, Astrophys. J., 146, 294.ADSGoogle Scholar
  89. 89.
    Hughes, C. J. 1965, Profiles of Lyman-alpha scattered by free electrons in the solar corona, Astrophys. J., 142, 321.ADSGoogle Scholar
  90. 90.
    Athay, R. G. 1965, Theoretical line intensities: I. Strong enission lines; II. Excitation of chromospheric He II and hydrogen, Astrophys. J., 142, 724.ADSGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    Athay, R. G. 1965, Theoretical line intensities: III. Solar UV lines and continua of H, He 1, and He 11 and the chromospheric model, Astrophys. J., 142, 755.ADSGoogle Scholar
  92. 92.
    Athay, R. G. 1966, Theoretical line intensities: IV. Source functions and equivalent widths, Astrophys. J., 144, 1159.ADSGoogle Scholar
  93. 93.
    Dietz, R. D., House, L. L. 1965, The formation of the Lyman continuum: isothermal atmosphere, Astrophys. J., 141, 1393.ADSzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  94. 94.
    Hearn, A. G. 1966, An interpretation of the total intensities of the Lyman a and β lines of hydrogen emitted by the Sun, U.K. Atomic Energy Authority, Research Group, Culham.Google Scholar
  95. 95.
    Suemoto, Z., Moriyama, F. 1964, Spotty appearance of the solar disk as inferred from the comparison between EUV and radio intensities, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 775 (also in 1964, I AU Symposium No. 23, Liège).Google Scholar
  96. 96.
    Jordan, C. 1966, The relative abundance of silicon, iron, and nickel in the solar corona, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 132, 463.ADSGoogle Scholar
  97. 97.
    Jordan, C. 1966, The abundance of iron in the solar corona, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 132, 515.ADSGoogle Scholar
  98. 98.
    Athay, R. G. 1966, Theoretical line intensities: V. Solar UV emission lines of heavyelements, Astrophys. J., 145, 784.ADSGoogle Scholar
  99. 99.
    Dupree, A. K., Goldberg, L. 1967, Solar abundance determination from ultraviolet emission lines, Solar Physics, 1, 229.ADSGoogle Scholar
  100. 100.
    Widing, K. G., Porter, J. R. 1965, Silicon in the solar corona, Ann. Astrophys 28, 779 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège)ADSGoogle Scholar
  101. 101.
    de Jager, C. 1965, Solar X-radiation, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 125 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  102. 102.
    Mandel’Shtam, S. L. 1965, On X-ray radiation of the quiet Sun, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 614 (also in 1964, IAU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  103. 103.
    Mandel’Shtam, S. L. 1965, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 587.ADSGoogle Scholar
  104. 104.
    Fetisov, E. P. 1964, Solar coronal radiation shortward of 10 Â, Soviet Astr., 8, 231, translated from Astr. Zu., 41, 299, 1964.Google Scholar
  105. 105.
    MandePShtam, S. L., Prokudina, V. S., Tindo, I. P., Fetisov, E. P. 1965, X-rays from the quiet Sun, Cosmic Res., 3, 601, translated from the Russian Kosm. Issled., 3, 737, 1965.Google Scholar
  106. 106.
    Zheleznyakov, V. V. 1965, The mechanism of y-ray emission of solar flares, Astr. Zu., 43, 96.ADSGoogle Scholar
  107. 107.
    Shklovsky, I. S. 1964, The inverse Compton effect as a possible cause of the X-ray radiation of solar flares, Nature, 202, 276.ADSGoogle Scholar
  108. 108.
    Shklovsky, I. S. 1965, Nature of solar X-ray emission, Soviet Astr., 8, 538, translated from Astr. Zu., 41, 676, 1964.Google Scholar
  109. 109.
    Korchat, A. A. 1965, The solar flares of 28 September 1961, and 20 March 1958, Cosmic Res., 3, 751, 1965.Google Scholar
  110. 110.
    Acton, L. W. 1964, Inverse Compton effect as a possible cause of the X-ray radiation of solar flates, Nature, 204, 64.ADSGoogle Scholar
  111. 111.
    Acton, L. W. 1965, Contribution of characteristic X-rays to the radiation of solar flares, Nature, 207, 737.ADSGoogle Scholar
  112. 112.
    Fazio, G. G., Dolan, J. F. 1965, The gamma-ray spectrum of the Sun, Rev. Geophys., 3, 319.ADSGoogle Scholar
  113. 113.
    Burgess, A. 1965, Dielectronic recombination in the corona, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 774 (also in 1964, I AU Symposium No. 23, Liège).ADSGoogle Scholar
  114. 114.
    Burgess, A. Dielectronic recombination, 1965 Proc. Second Harvard-Smithsonian Conference on Stellar Atmospheres, p. 47.Google Scholar
  115. 115.
    Goldberg, L., Dupree, A. K., Allen, J. W. 1965, Collisional excitation of autoionizing levels, Ann. Astrophys, 28, 589.ADSGoogle Scholar

Bibliographie

  1. 1.
    Hemstreet, H. S., Loening, W. F. 1966, Princeton Advanced Satellite Study Final Report, Perkin-Elmer Corp., Norwalk, Conn., 584 p.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    European Space Research Organisation 1966, General Report 1964-65, Paris, 36 rue la Pérouse, p. 143.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Houziaux, L., Ed. 1965, Second Report on the S1/S2/S68 Scanning Experiment for ESRO stabilised Satellite TD, Liège, Institut d’Astrophysique.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hallam, K., Mangus, J. 1965, An Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer for Satellite Astronomy, in Jap. J. Appl. Phys. 4, suppl. 1.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    United Kingdom Report on Space Research, 1965-66, 1966, British National Committee on Space Research, The R. Soc., pp. 30–33.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    United States Space Science Program 1966, Report to Cospar, Ninth Meeting Vienna, May 1966, Nat. Acad. Sci., Nat. Res. Council, pp. 1–3.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Morton, D. C., Spitzer, L. 1966, Line Spectra of Delta and Pi Scorpii in the far ultraviolet, Astrophys. J., 144, 1.ADSGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Morton, D. C. 1967, Astrophys. J., 147, 1017.ADSGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Henize, K. G., Wackerling, L. R. 1966, Stellar Ultraviolet Spectra from Gemini 11, Sky and Telescope, 32, 204.ADSGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Dinov, N. A., Severny, A. B. Communication présentée au Symposium International Lunar Laboratory, Athènes, septembre 1965.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Report on Swiss Space Research, présenté au 9ème Cospar Vienne, 1966.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Boggess, A. III. 1964, B Star Colours between 2000 and 3000 angstroms, (IAU Symp. No. 23, Liège, 1964) Ann. Astrophys., 27, 805.ADSGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Stecher, T. P. 1964, Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry of Early-Type Stars, Astr. J., 69, 1000 558.ADSGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Byram, E. T., Chubb, T. A., Werner, M. W. 1965, 1115Â for Ultraviolet Stellar Photometry, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 594.ADSGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Seaton, M. J. 1965, Far Ultraviolet Radiation: Stars, Nebulae and Interstellar Matter, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 151.ADSGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Boggess, A. III., Borgman, J. 1964, Interstellar Extinction in the Middle Ultraviolet, Astrophys. J., 140, 1636.ADSGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Spitzer, L., Jr., Dressler, K., Upson, W. L. 1964, Theoretical Equivalent Widths of the Interstellar H2 Lines, Publ. astr. Soc. Pacific, 76, 387.ADSGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Brandt, J. C. 1965, On Interstellar Raman Line H2 Excited by Lyman-a, Publ. astr. Soc. Pacific, 77, 212.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Byram, E. T., Chubb, T. A., Friedman, H. 1964, On the Absence of a Nebular Glow Around a Virginis in the Far Ultraviolet, Astrophys. J., 139, 113s.Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Wickramasinghe, N. C. Oct. 7, 1965, Graphite Grains and Graphite Core-Ice Mantle Grains, Orange Aid Preprint Series in Nuclear Astrophysics (submitted to Transactions of I AU: Colloquium of Interstellar Grains ).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Wickramasinghe, N. C. 1966, On the Optics of Small Graphite Spheres I, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 131, 263.ADSGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Somerville, W. B. 1965, “The Continuous Absorption Coefficient of He”, Astrophys. J., 141, 811.ADSGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    Solomon, P. M. 1964, The Absorption Coefficient of Quasi-Molecular Hydrogen, Astrophys. J., 139, 999.ADSGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Werner, M. W. 1964, He H+ and Flux Déficiences in the Region A À 1600-2400 of the Spectra of Early-Type Stars, Astrophys. J., 139, 1014.ADSGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Morton, D. C. 1964, The Effect of Line-Blanketing on Ultraviolet Stellar Radiation, Astrophys. J., 139, 1383.ADSGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Mihalas, D. M., Morton, D. C. 1965, A Model for a Bi V Star with Line Blanketing, Astrophys. J., 142, 253.ADSGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Avrett, E. H., Strom, S. E. 1964, Comparison Between Model Atmospheres and Spectra from Early-Type Stars, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 781.ADSGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Guillaume, C. 1966, Theoretical Model of a B 1-5 star with Line Blanketing, Bull. astr. Inst. Netherl., 18, 175.ADSGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    Morton, D. C. 1965, Theoretical Line Profiles in the Ultraviolet Spectra of Early-Type Stars, Astrophys. J., 141, 73.ADSGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    Guillaume, C., Van Rensbergen, W., Underhill, A. B. 1965, The Theoretical Near Ultraviolet Spectrum of a B2 Star, Bull. astr. Inst. Netherl., 18, 106.ADSGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Houziaux, L. 1965, The Lyman Lines in the Spectrum of Main Sequence Early-Type Stars, Acad. r. Belg. Bull. CI. Sei., 60, 699.Google Scholar
  32. 32.
    Eist, E. W. 1966, The Predicted Line Blocking in the Spectral Region 1900 to 3000 Â of a B Star, Bull. astr. Inst. Netherl. (à paraître).Google Scholar
  33. 33.
    Heddle, D. W. O. 1964, The Importance of Absolute Photometry, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 800.ADSGoogle Scholar
  34. 34.
    Burbidge, E. M. 1965, Ultraviolet Emission from Galaxies, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 164.ADSGoogle Scholar
  35. 35.
    Nikol’ski, G. M. 1964, Structure and Far Ultraviolet Radiation of the Upper Stellar Atmosphere. II. Distribution of Electron Concentration and Temperature, Soviet Astr., 8, 193.ADSGoogle Scholar
  36. 36.
    Houziaux, L. 1966, Revised Estimates of the Amounts of Radiation to be Expected from Stars in the Ultraviolet, ESRO Scient. Memo no. 3, Paris, 1–14.Google Scholar
  37. 37.
    Houziaux, L., Honnay, S. 1966, Photométrie ultraviolette des amas galactiques à partir de satellites artificiels, Bull. Acad. r. Belg. Cl. Sei., 947, 968.Google Scholar
  38. 38.
    Agapov, E. S., Anisimov, V. P., Brainfel’d, S. G., Mozherin, V. M., Prokofiev, V. V., Simenink, S. M. Sept. 1965, Travail présenté au i6ème congrès international d’astronautique à Athènes.Google Scholar
  39. 39.
    Bowyer, S., Byram, E. T., Chubb, T. A., Friedman, H. 1965, Observational Results of X-ray Astronomy, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 791.ADSGoogle Scholar
  40. 40.
    Fisher, P. C., Clark, G. W., Meyerott, A. J., Smith, K. L., 1964, Observational Results on X-rays, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 809.ADSGoogle Scholar
  41. 41.
    Fisher, P. C., Meyerott, A. J. 1964, Stellar X-ray Emission, Astrophys. J., 139, 123.ADSGoogle Scholar
  42. 42.
    Bowyer, S. 1964, An Alternate Interpretation of the paper * Stellar X-ray Emission’ by Fisher and Meyerott, Astrophys. J., 140, 820.ADSGoogle Scholar
  43. 43.
    Fisher, P. C., Johnson, H. M., Jordan, W. C., Meyerott, A. J., Acton, L. W. 1966, Observations of Cosmic X-rays, Astrophys. J., 143, 203.ADSGoogle Scholar
  44. 44.
    Byram, E. T., Chubb, T. A., Friedman, H. 1966, Cosmic X-ray Sources, Galactic and Extragalactic, Science, 152, 66.ADSGoogle Scholar
  45. 45.
    Morrison, P., Sartri, L. 1965, X-ray Emission from Remnants of Type-1 Supernovas, Phys. Rev. Lett., 14, 771.ADSGoogle Scholar
  46. 46.
    Peterson, L. E., Jacobson, A. S., Pelling, R. M. 1966, Spectrum of Crab Nebula X-rays to 120 keV, Phys. Rev. Lett., 16, 142.ADSGoogle Scholar
  47. 47.
    Johnson, H. M. 1966, The Distribution of X-ray Sources in the Galaxy, Astrophys. J. 143, 261.ADSGoogle Scholar
  48. 48.
    Brini, D., Cattani, D., Ciriggi, U., Fuligni, F., Galli, M., Gandolfi, A., Moretti, C. 1965, Results of an X-ray Scanning of the Sky in the 20-200 keV Energy Range, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 1034.ADSGoogle Scholar
  49. 49.
    Giacconi, R., Gursky, H. 1965, Observations of X-ray Sources Outside the Solar System, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 151.ADSGoogle Scholar
  50. 50.
    Hayakawa, S., Matsuoka, M., Yamashita, K. 1966, Observations of Energy Spectra of Galactic X-rays, Rep. Ion. and Space Res. in Japan, 20, no. 4.Google Scholar
  51. 51.
    Bowyer, S., Byram, E. T., Chubb, T. A., Friedman, H. 1964, X-ray Emission from the Direction of Scorpius, Astr. J., 69, 135.ADSGoogle Scholar
  52. 52.
    Chodil, G., Jopson, R. C., Mark, H., Steward, F. D., Swift, C. D., X-ray Spectra from Scorpius (Sco-XR-i) and the Sun observed above the Atmosphere, Phys. Rev. Lett., 15, 605.Google Scholar
  53. 53.
    Manley, O. P. 1966, X-ray Emission from Sco X-i, Astrophys. J., 144, 1253.ADSGoogle Scholar
  54. 54.
    Gursky, H., Giacconi, R., Gorenstein, P., Waters, J. R., Oda, M., Bradt, H., Garmire, G., Sreekantan, B. V. 1966, A Measurement of the Location of the X-ray Source Sco X-i, Astrophys. J., 146, 310.ADSGoogle Scholar
  55. 55.
    Gursky, H. 1966, The Identification of the X-ray Source in Scorpius, Sky Telesc., 32, 252.ADSGoogle Scholar
  56. 56.
    Clark, G. W. 1965, Balloon Observation of the X-ray Spectrum of the Crab Nebula above iske V, Phys. Rev. Lett., 14, 91.ADSGoogle Scholar
  57. 57.
    Boyd, R. L. F. 1965, Techniques for the Measurement of Extraterrestrial soft X-Radiation, Space Sci. Rev., 4, 35.ADSGoogle Scholar
  58. 58.
    Mayer, U. 1964, Optical Focussing with Soft X-rays and in the Extreme Ultraviolet, Space Sci. Rev., 3, 781.ADSGoogle Scholar
  59. 59.
    Cobb, R., Duthrie, J. G., Stewart, J. 1965, Spark-chamber Experiment on Cosmic Gamma Rays, Phys. Rev. Lett., 15, 507.ADSGoogle Scholar
  60. 60.
    Kraushaar, W. L. 1965, Cosmic Gamma Rays Experimental, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 202.ADSGoogle Scholar
  61. 61.
    Long, C. D., Porter, N. A., Weeks, T. C., Fruin, J. F., Jelley, J. V. 1965, Astronomical Observations from Space Vehicles: Upper Limits to the Flux of High Energy y-rays from Selected Quasi-Stellar and other Sources using the Cerenkov Technique, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 263.ADSGoogle Scholar
  62. 62.
    Ogelman, H. B., Delvaille, J. P., Greisen, K. I. Search for Discrete Sources of Cosmic Gamma Rays above 1 GeV, Phys. Rev. Lett., 16, 491.Google Scholar
  63. 63.
    Kraushaar, W., Clark, G. W., Garmire, G., Helmken, H., Higbie, P., Agogino, M. 1965, Explorer XI Experiments on Cosmic Gamma Rays, Astrophys. J., 141, 845.ADSGoogle Scholar
  64. 64.
    Bahcall, J. N., Wolf, R. A. 1965, An Observational Test of Theories of Neutron-Star Cooling, Astrophys. J., 142, 1254.ADSGoogle Scholar
  65. 65.
    Burbidge, G. R., Gould, R. J., Tucker, W. H. 1965, Galactic X-ray Sources, Phys. Rev. Lett., 24.Google Scholar
  66. 66.
    Clayton, D. D., Craddock, W. L. 1965, Radioactivity in Supernova Remnants, 1002 Astrophys. J., 142, 189.ADSGoogle Scholar
  67. 67.
    Dolan, J. F. 1965, The Expected Polarization of X-rays from Celestial Sources, Astr. J., 70, 137.Google Scholar
  68. 68.
    Finzi, A. 1965, Cooling of a Neutron Star by the ‘Urea’ Process, Phys. Rev., 137, B472–B476.ADSGoogle Scholar
  69. 69.
    Garmire, G., Kraushaar, W. L. 1965, High Energy Cosmic Gamma Rays, Space Scu Rev., 4, 123.ADSGoogle Scholar
  70. 70.
    Ginzburg, V. L., Syrovatskii, S. I. 1964, Nature of Discrete X-ray Sources, Soviet Phys., 9, 831.Google Scholar
  71. 71.
    Ginzburg, V. L., Syrovatskii, S. I. 1964, Gamma-rays and Cyclotron Radiation X-rays of Galactic and Metagalactic Origin, JETP, 18, 245.Google Scholar
  72. 72.
    Gould, R. J. 1965, Origin of Cosmic X-rays, Phys. Rev. Lett., 15, 511.ADSMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  73. 73.
    Ginzburg, V. L., Syrovatskii, S. I. 1964, Some Problems of Gamma and X-ray Astronomy, Soviet Phys. Usp., 7, 696.ADSGoogle Scholar
  74. 74.
    Gould, R. J., Burbidge, G. R. 1965, High Energy Cosmic Photons and Neutrons, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 171.ADSGoogle Scholar
  75. 75.
    Gould, R. J. 1965, High-Energy Photons from the Compton-Synchroton Process in the Crab Nebula, Phys. Rev. Lett., 15, 577.ADSGoogle Scholar
  76. 76.
    Gould, R. J., Sciama, D. W. 1964, Cosmic X-ray and Infrared Rays as Tools for Exploring the Large Scale Structure of the Universe, Astrophys. J., 140, 1634.ADSGoogle Scholar
  77. 77.
    Gurzadyan, G. A. 1965, Possibility of X-ray Emission by Cosmic Radio Sources, Societ Phys. Dokl., 9, 841.Google Scholar
  78. 78.
    Hovenier, J. W. 1966, X-ray Spectra Produced by Thermal Bremsstrahlung, Bull, astr. Inst. Netherl., 18, 185.ADSGoogle Scholar
  79. 79.
    Hoyle, F. 1965, Origin of Cosmic X-rays, Phys. Rev. Lett., 15, 131.ADSGoogle Scholar
  80. 80.
    Jelley, J. V. 1966, High-Energy y-ray Absorption in Space by a 3’5°K Microwave Field, Phys. Rev. Lett., 16, 479.ADSGoogle Scholar
  81. 81.
    Manley, O. P. 1966, Early Radiation Field and High-Energy Electrons in Supernovae, Nature, 209, 901.ADSGoogle Scholar
  82. 82.
    Morton, D. C. 1964, Neutron Stars as X-ray Sources, Astrophys. J. 140, 460.ADSzbMATHGoogle Scholar
  83. 83.
    Nikol’skii, G. M. 1964, Soft X-radiation from Stars, Soviet Phys. Dokl., 8, 646.ADSGoogle Scholar
  84. 84.
    Orzag, S. A. 1965, Neutron-Star Atmospheres, Astrophys. J., 142, 473.Google Scholar
  85. 85.
    Overbeck, J. W. 1965, Small-Angle Scattering of Celestial X-rays by Interstellar Grains, Astrophys. J., 141, 864.ADSGoogle Scholar
  86. 86.
    Pacini, F. 1966, High-Energy Astrophysics and a Possible Sub-nuclear Energy Source Nature, 209, 389.ADSGoogle Scholar
  87. 87.
    Shklovsky, I. S. 1964, On the Nature of the X-Ray Sources, Astr. Zu., 42, 287.ADSGoogle Scholar
  88. 88.
    Surdin, M. 1966, X-ray Emission from very Dense Stars, Nature, 209, 62.ADSGoogle Scholar
  89. 89.
    Vlasov, N. A. 1965, Optical Search for Antimatter in the Universe, Soviet Astr., 8, 715.ADSGoogle Scholar
  90. 90.
    Woltjer, L. 1964, X-rays and Type I Supernova Remnants, Astrophys. J., 140, 1309.ADSMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  91. 91.
    Lüst, R. 1966, Theoretical Aspects of Celestial Gamma-rays, ESRO SM-60, Paris.Google Scholar
  92. 92.
    Biermann, L. 1966, Theoretical Aspects of Extraterrestrial X-rays of non Solar Origin ESRO SM-58, Paris.Google Scholar
  93. 93.
    Lequeux, J. 1966, Rayons cosmiques et rayonnement synchroton, ESRO SM-54, Paris.Google Scholar
  94. 94.
    Woolf, N. J. 1965, Infrared Spectra of Stars, Planets and the Moon from Stratoscope II, Ann. Astrophys., 28, 218.ADSGoogle Scholar
  95. 95.
    Woolf, N. J., Schwarzschild, M., Rose, W. K. 1964, Infrared Spectra of Red-Giant Stars, Astrophys. J., 140, 833.ADSGoogle Scholar
  96. 96.
    Danielson, R. E., Woolf, N. J., Gaustad, J. E. 1965, A Search for Interstellar Ice Absorption in the Infrared Spectrum of Mu Cephei, Astrophys. J., 141, 116.ADSGoogle Scholar
  97. 97.
    Gould, R. J. 1964, Infrared Emission Lines from Celestial Sources, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 815.ADSGoogle Scholar
  98. 98.
    Stein, W. 1966, Infrared Radiation from Interstellar Grains, Astrophys. J., 144, 318.ADSGoogle Scholar
  99. 99.
    Smith, F. G. 1964, Low Frequency Radio Astronomical Observations from Rockets and Satellites, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 819.ADSGoogle Scholar
  100. 100.
    Huguenin, G. R., Papagiannis, M. D. 1965, Spaceborne Observations of Radio Noise from 0-7 to 7-0 MHz and their Dependence on the Terrestrial Environment, Ann. Astrophys. 28, 239.ADSGoogle Scholar
  101. 101.
    Huguenin, G. R., Lilley, A. E., Donough, W. H. Papagiannis, M. D. 1964, Measurements of Radio Noise at 0-700 Me and 2*200 Me from a high-altitude Rocket Probe, Planet. Space Sci. 12, 1157.ADSGoogle Scholar
  102. 102.
    Hartz, T. R. 1964, Observations of the Galactic Radio Emission between 1*5 and 10 MHz from the Alouette Satellite, Ann. Astrophys., 27, 823.ADSGoogle Scholar
  103. 103.
    Alexander, J. K., Stone, R. G. 1965, Rocket Measurements of Cosmic-Noise Intensities Below 5 Mc/s, Astrophys. J., 142, 1327.ADSGoogle Scholar
  104. 104.
    Smith, F. G. 1965, Cosmic Radio Noise as Measured in the Satellite Ariel II, Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 131, 145.ADSGoogle Scholar
  105. 105.
    Weyman, R., Chapman, G. 1965, On the Possibility of Detecting Stellar Coronas at Radio Frequencies. Astrophys. J., 142, 1268.ADSGoogle Scholar

Bibliography

  1. Dressler, A. J. 1966, Solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field, submitted to Rev. Geophysics.Google Scholar
  2. Haerendel, G. 1965, Interplanetary space, Landolt-Bornstein, 1, 233.Google Scholar
  3. Hess, W. N., Mead, G. D. 1966, Particles and field research, A Bibliography, NASA SP-7026.Google Scholar
  4. Lust, R. 1966, The properties of the interplanetary medium, presented at the Inter-Union Symposium on Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Belgrade.Google Scholar
  5. Mackin, Jr., R. J., Neugebauer, M. 1966, The solar wind, Proceedings of a Conference at Caltech, sponsored by J. P. Lab., Pasadena, Pergamon Press.Google Scholar
  6. Ness, N. F. 1966, Measurements of the magnetic fields in interplanetary space and the magnetosphere, Proc. of the Ninth International Conference on Cosmic Rays, London, 1, 14.Google Scholar
  7. Parker, E. N. 1963, Interplanetary dynamical processes, Interscience Div. of J. Wiley and Sons, N.Y.Google Scholar
  8. Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Cosmic Rays 1966, The Inst, of Physics and Phys. Society, London, 1, 2.Google Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Bonnetti, A., Bridge, H. S., Lazarus, A. J., Rossi, B., Scherb, F. 1963, Explorer 10 plasma measurements, J. geophys. Res., 68, 4017.ADSGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Gringauz, K. I., Bezrukikh, V. V., Ozerov, V. D., Rybchinskii, R. E. i960, A study of the interplanetary ionized gas, high-energy electrons, and corpuscular radiation from the Sun by means of the three electrode traps for charged particles on the second Soviet cosmic rocket, Dokl. Acad. Nauk SSSR, 131, 1301.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Gringauz, K. I. 1961, Some results of experiments in interplanetary space by means of charged particle traps on Soviet space probes, Space Res., 2, 539.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Gringauz, K. I., Kurt, V. G., Morog, V. I., Sklovskij, I. C. 1961, Sbornik, Iskusstvennye Sputniki Zemli, Izd. An. SSSR, 6, 108.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Neugebauer, M., Snyder, C. W. 1962, Solar plasma experiment: Preliminary Mariner 2 observations, Science, 138, 1095.ADSGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Wolfe, J. H., Silva, R. W., Myers, M. A. 1966, Observations of the solar wind during the flight of IMP-i, J. geophys. Res., 71, 1319.ADSGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Coon, J. H. 1966, Vela satellite measurements of particles in the solar wind and the distant geomagnetosphere, Space Res., 6.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Neugebauer, M., Snyder, C. W. 1966, Mariner 2 observations of the solar wind, I. Average properties, to be published in J. geophys. Res.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Bridge, H., Egidi, A., Lazarus, A., Lyon, E., Jacobson, L. 1965, Preliminary results of plasma measurements on I MP-A, Space Res., 5, 969.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Wolfe, J. H., Silva, R. W., Myers, M. A. 1966, Preliminary results from the Ames Research Center plasma probes observations of the solar wind geomagnetic field; interaction region on IMP-2 and OGO-i. NASA Space Sci. Div., Ames Res. Center, Calif.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Hundhausen, A. J., Ashbridge, J. R., Bame, S. J., Gilbert, H. E., Strong, I. B. 1966, Vela 3 satellite observations of solar wind ions: A preliminary report, Univ. of Calif., Los Alamos Sci. Lab., Los Alamos.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Strong, I. B., Ashbridge, J. R., Bame, S. J., Heckmann, H. H., Hundhausen, A. J. 1966, Measurements of proton temperatures in the solar wind, Phys. Rev. Lett., 16, 631.ADSGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Gringauz, K. I., Bezrukikh, V. V., Musatov, L. S. 1966, Observations of the solar wind by Venus 3 probe, presented at the Interunion Symposium on Solar Terrestrial Physics, Belgrade.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Wolfe, H. H., et al. 1966, The compositional, anisotropic and non-radial flow characteristics of the solar wind, J. geophys. Res., 71, 3329.ADSGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Snyder, C. W., Neugebauer, M., Rao, U. R. 1963, The solar wind velocity and its correlation with cosmic ray variations and with solar and geomagnetic activity, J. geophys. Res., 68, 6361.ADSGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Strong, I. B., Ashbridge, J. R., Bame, S. J., Heckmann, H. H., Hundhausen, A. J. 1966, Measurements of proton temperatures in the solar wind, Phys. Rev. Lett., 16, 631.ADSGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Coleman, P. J., Jr., Sonett, C. P., Judge, D. L., Smith, E. J. 1960, Some preliminary results of the Pioneer 5 magnetometer experiment, J. geophys. Res., 65, 1865.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    Coleman, P. J., Jr., Davis, L., Jr., Sonett, C. P. i960, Steady component of the interplanetary magnetic field: Pioneer 5, Phys. Rev. Lett., 5, 43.ADSGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Coleman, P. J., Jr., Davis, L., Jr., Smith, E. J., Sonett, C. P. 1962, The mission of Mariner 2: Preliminary observations of interplanetary magnetic fields, Science, 138, 1099.ADSGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    Coleman, P. J., Jr., Smith, E. J., Davis, L., Jr., Jones, D. E. 1966, Measurements of fields in the vicinity of the magnetosphere and in interplanetary space: Preliminary results from Mariner 4, Space Res., 6.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Ness, N. F., Scearce, C. S., Seek, J. B. 1964, Initial results of the IMP-i magnetic field experiment, J. geophys. Res., 69, 3531.ADSGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ness, N. F., Scearce, C. S., Seek, J. B., Wilcox, J. M. 1965, A summary of results from the IMP-i magnetic field experiment, presented at Buenos Aires, COSPAR Conference.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Ness, N. F., Scearce, C. S., Cantarano, S. 1966, Preliminary results from the Pioneer 6 magnetic field experiment, J. geophys. Res., 71, 3305.ADSGoogle Scholar
  24. 24.
    Ness, N. F., Wilcox, J. M. 1964, Solar origin of the interplanetary magnetic field, Phys. Rev. Lett., 13, 461.ADSGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    Ness, N. F., Wilcox, J. M. 1966, Extension of the photospheric magnetic field into interplanetary space, Astrophys. Jf., 143, 23.ADSGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    Coleman, P. J., Jr., Davis, L., Jr., Smith, E. J., Jones, D. E. 1966, Variations in the polarity distribution of the interplanetary magnetic field, Jf. geophys. Res., 71, 2831.ADSGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    Wilcox, J. M., Ness, N. F. 1965, Quasi stationary corotating structure in the interplanetary medium Jf. geophys. Res., 70, 5793.ADSGoogle Scholar
  28. 28.
    Babcock, H. W., Babcock, H. D., Simpson, J. A. 1955, Association of a ‘unipolar’ magnetic region on the Sun with changes of primary cosmic-ray intensity, Phys. Rev., 98, 4402.Google Scholar
  29. 29.
    Fan, C. Y., Gloeckler, G., Simpson, J. A. 1966, Protons and helium nuclei within interplanetary regions which correlate with the Sun, Proc. of the Int. Conf. on Cosmic Rays, 1, 109.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    Bryant, D. A., Cline, T. L., Desai, U. D., McDonald, F. B. 1962, Explorer 12 observations of solar cosmic rays and energetic storm particles after the solar flare of September 28, 1961, J. geophys. Res., 67, 4983.ADSGoogle Scholar
  31. 31.
    Bryant, D. A., Cline, T. L., Desai, U. D., McDonald, F. B. 1963, New evidence for long-lived solar streams in interplanetary space, Phys. Rev. Lett., 11, 144.ADSGoogle Scholar
  32. 32.
    Bryant, D. A., Cline, T. L., Desai, U. D., McDonald, F. B. 1965, Studies of solar protons with Explorers 12 and 14, Astrophys. Jf., 141, 478.ADSGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.
    Mustel, E. R. 1965, Astr. Zu., 42, 473.ADSGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kalinin, Yu. D., Mogilevsky, E. I. 1965, Issled Kosmich. Prostr. (Investigations of Outer Space), ‘Nauka’ Publishing House.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Antonova, T. D., Vitkevich, V. V., Vlasov, V. I. 1966, Preprint, Lebedev Physical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the U.S.S.R.,Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Vitkevich, V. V., Vlasov, V. I. 1966, Paper presented at the Belgrade Symposium on Solar Terrestrial Physics. (Preprint, Ledebev Physical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the U.S.S.R.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bezrukikh, V. V., Gringauz, K. I., Musatov, L. S., Rybchinsky, R. E., Khokhlov, M. Z. 1965, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 163, 873.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Gringauz, K. I., Bezrukikh, V. V., Musatov, L. S. 1966, Paper presented at the Symposium on Solar Terrestrial Physics, Belgrade.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Gringauz, K. I., Bezrukikh, V. V., Remizov, A. P., Khokhlov, M. Z., Musatov, L. S. 1966, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 170, 570.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gringauz, K. I., Bezrukikh, V. V., Khokhlov, M. Z., Zastenker, G. N., Remizov, A. P., Musatov, L. S. 1966, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, 170, 1306.Google Scholar
  9. ReferencesGoogle Scholar
  10. 1.
    Babichenko, S. I., Karpinsky, I. P. et al. 1965, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 3, 237.Google Scholar
  11. 2.
    Katiushina, V. V., Kurt, V. G. 1965, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 3, 243.Google Scholar
  12. 3.
    Kaplan, S. A., Kurt, V. G. 1965, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 3, 256.Google Scholar
  13. 4.
    Kaplan, S.A., Kurt, V. G. 1965, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 3, 251.Google Scholar
  14. 5.
    Kurt, V. G. 1966, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 4, 111.Google Scholar
  15. 6.
    Kurt, V. G. 1966, Space Res., 6, Buenos-Aires.Google Scholar
  16. 7.
    Katiushina, V. V. 1966, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 4, 619.Google Scholar
  17. 8.
    Kurt, V. G. 1967, Space Res., 7, Vienna.Google Scholar
  18. 9.
    Kurt, V. G., Germogenova, T. A. 1967, Astr. Zu., 44, 2.Google Scholar
  19. 10.
    Germogenova, T. A. 1966, Astrofisica, 2, 3, 251.MathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  20. 11.
    Kurt, V. G. 1965, Issledovaniia cosmicheskogo prostranstva, Nauka, Moscow, 576.Google Scholar
  21. 12.
    Kaplan, S. A., Katiushina, V. V., Kurt, V. G. 1964, Space Res., 5, Warszawa.Google Scholar
  22. 13.
    Katiushina, V. V. 1965, Cosmicheskie issledovaniia, 3, 248.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Goldberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Harvard College ObservatoryCambridgeUSA

Personalised recommendations