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Viral Agents Associated with Neonatal Diarrhoea and their Detection by Electron Microscopy

  • M. S. McNulty
  • W. L. Curran
  • J. B. McFerran
Chapter
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Part of the Current Topics in Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science book series (CTVM, volume 13)

Abstract

Simple techniques for diagnosis of enteric viral infections by direct electron microscopy of faeces are described. For best results, some degree of purification and/or concentration of faecal material is necessary. This can be adequately achieved by differential centrifugation. A number of viruses have been observed in the faeces of the domestic animal species and man. These include rotaviruses, coronaviruses, astroviruses, caliciviruses, adenoviruses, parvoviruses and enterovirus-like particles. Mixed infections with combinations of these viruses are extremely common. Caution should be exercised in interpretation of results. Detection of one of the above viruses in the faeces of an animal with diarrhoea does not necessarily indicate etiological significance.

Keywords

Mixed Infection Infectious Bronchitis Virus Enteric Virus Viral Enteritis Immune Electron Microscopy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© ECSC, EEC, EAEC, Brussels-Luxembourg 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. S. McNulty
    • 1
  • W. L. Curran
    • 1
  • J. B. McFerran
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterinary Research LaboratoriesBelfastN. Ireland

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