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Permafrost

  • Dorothy K. Hall
  • Jaroslav Martinec
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Abstract

Permafrost is a very important condition of the Earth’s lithosphere. Permafrost is defined as any material that maintains a temperature below 0°C for at least 2 years. It underlies 20 to 25% of the land surface of the Earth and is also found off-shore in many polar areas (Fig. 6.1). In the northern hemisphere permafrost covers an estimated 2.3 x 106 km2 in area (Fujii and Higuchi, 1978). The occurrence of permafrost is either continuous, or discontinuous in which large masses of unfrozen ground may be interspersed with masses of permafrost.

Keywords

Forest Cover Type Permafrost Area Tussock Tundra Impulse Radar Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Chapman and Hall Ltd. and J. Martinec 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dorothy K. Hall
  • Jaroslav Martinec

There are no affiliations available

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