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Photoreduction and Photodegradation of Inorganic Pollutants: I. Cyanides

  • Nick Serpone
  • Enrico Borgarello
  • Ezio Pelizzetti
Chapter
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIC, volume 237)

Abstract

Pollution is the contamination of air, land and water with materials that detract from their ability to support the ecosystem or provide some human need. Human activities, industrial processes and agricultural usage of some of the materials are the big contributors to the pollution problems. Cyanide is ubiquitous in nature; however, the increasing use of cyanide in industrial processes (for example in the cyanadation process to extract noble metals from their ores, or the manufacturing of plastics, among others) finds a parallel in the increasing quantities of cyanide dispersed in the environment. Conventional means to dispose of CN- involve oxidation by chlorine/alkaline sol-solutions, chlorination, ozonation, and electrolysis. We discuss here two additional methods for detoxifying cyanide waste waters: (i) transformation of CN- to the less toxic SCN- form, and (ii) total degradation via oxidation with peroxides to give CO2 and NH3 (or N2).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nick Serpone
    • 1
  • Enrico Borgarello
    • 2
  • Ezio Pelizzetti
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryConcordia UniversityMontrealCanada
  2. 2.EniRicercheSan Donato MilaneseItalia
  3. 3.Dipartimento di Chimica AnaliticaUniversita di TorinoTorinoItalia

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