Advertisement

Abstract

Long term delayed luminescence of green organisms in the time range between 0.3 s and several minutes (LDL) has been investigated on a kinetical and a spectral basis. A specific influence of various exogeneous parameters such as herbicides or essential elements, different pH values, temperature, preillumination and diurnal rhythms is found. LDL is particularly dependent on nutrinional deficiencies and depletion of essential elements and environmental pollutive components, probably involving both photosynthetic reaction centers PSI and PSII. Therefore, LDL offers itself as a convenient, highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive assay for a number of stress factors in photosynthesizing plants in the field.

Key Words

Delayed luminescence forest decline (Waldsterben) pollution control photosynthesis chlorophyll fluorescence 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Amesz, J. and Gorkom, H. J. V. (1978): Delayed fluorescence in photosynthesis. Ann. Rev. Plant Physiol. 29, 47–66CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bazzas, F.A., Rolfe, G.L. and Carlson, R.W. (1974): Effect of Cd on photosynthesis and transpiration of excised leaves of corn and sunflower. Plant Physiol. 32, 373–376CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Butjas, C. and Cseh, E. (1981): Effect of heavy metals and chelating agents on potassium uptake of cereal roots. Plant and Soil 63, 97–100CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bürger, J. and Schmidt, W. (1988): Long term delayed luminescence: A fast and convenient assay for nutritional deficiencies and environmental pollution damages in plants. Plant and Soil, in pressGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Lavorel, J. (1975): Luminescence. In: Bioenergetics of Photosynthesis (Govindjee, R. ed.), pp. 223–317, Academic Press, New York, San Francisco, LondonCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Malkin, S. (1977): Delayed Luminescence. In Primary Processes of Photosynthesis., (Barber, J., ed.), pp. 349–431, North Holland Biomedical PressGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Ökotest Magazin (1986): Kommunale Abwasser-Satzungen, Grenzwerte für Schadstoffeinleitungen der Länderarbeitsgemeinschaft Wasser (LAWA), 9, 36–41Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Schmidt, W. (1985): Prompt and delayed fluorescence in mature tabacco leaves: a spectral comparison. Photobiochem. Photobiophys. 9, 89–97Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Schmidt, W. and Senger, H. (1987a): Long—term delayed luminescence in Scenedesmus obliquus I. Spectral and kinetic properties. Biochim. Biophys. Acta 890, 15–22CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Schmidt, W. and Senger, H. (1987 b): Long—term delayed luminescence in Scenedesmus obliquus II. Influence of exogeneous factors. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 891, 22–27CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Strehler, B. L. and Arnold, W. (1951): Light production by green plants. J. Gen. Physiol. 34, 809–820CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Werner Schmidt
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KonstanzKonstanzGermany

Personalised recommendations