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Application of the PAM Fluorometer in Stress Detection

  • U. Schreiber
  • W. Bilger
  • C. Klughammer
  • C. Neubauer

Abstract

Different parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence contain a wealth of information on the state of the photosynthetic apparatus, which is affected in more or less direct ways by environmental stress. The recently developed PAM Fluorometer provides the means to harvest this information. Essential aspects for practical applications in ecophysiology are portability, tolerance of unfiltered sun light and diagnostic techniques for localization of stress induced changes. Additional insights are possible by means of a new emitter-detector unit converting the fluorometer into a system for measuring P700 absorbance changes. Some examples of application are given, relating to Fusarium infection, photoinhibition and drought stress.

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References

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • U. Schreiber
    • 1
  • W. Bilger
    • 1
  • C. Klughammer
    • 1
  • C. Neubauer
    • 1
  1. 1.Lehrstuhl Botanik IUniversität WürzburgWürzburgGermany

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